01:39 - Source: CNN
No school bus? Pile on a motorbike

Story highlights

Eulalia from Peru is one of few indigenous children able to go to school

Eulalia attends a boarding school run by the humanitarian organization CARE

CARE: 73% of indigenous children in Peru are behind in school and nearly 30% don't go to school

Child labor is often used for illegal gold mining in Peru

CNN Films’ “Girl Rising” documents extraordinary girls and the power of education to change the world.

CNN —  

Eulalia goes to school on a motorcycle.

The 10-year-old girl lives in the Puno region of Peru with her parents and six siblings. There is no school near Eulalia’s home, so on Mondays, her father gives her a ride down the mountain on his motorcycle to a boarding school run by the humanitarian organization CARE. She attends school during the week and comes home on the weekends.

For Eulalia, this ride to school is a journey into a promising future that is hard to come by in Peru. She is one of nearly a million indigenous children who struggle to get an education.

Eulalia lives in rural Peru with her parents and six siblings.  Her favorite subject is math and she wants to be a teacher.
CARE
Eulalia lives in rural Peru with her parents and six siblings. Her favorite subject is math and she wants to be a teacher.

According to CARE, 73% of indigenous kids in Peru are behind in school for their age and nearly 30% don’t go to school at all. Most people in the Puno region live in poverty and parents have no choice but to have their children work to help support the family. Child labor is often used for illegal gold mining in the area.

Eulalia’s father is a poor alpaca shepherd, but he wants his daughter to have a better education than he had and he has made it a priority. The school doesn’t charge Eulalia’s family for school fees, but her parents try to contribute in other ways such as with crops or labor. Soon, her little brother will also be attending the school.

Eulalia’s favorite subject is math but her father says she likes “everything.” When she grows up, she wants to be a teacher. Eulalia’s loving spirit is what endears her to the people at CARE.

Eulalia is 10 years old and  lives in the Puno region of Peru.
CARE
Eulalia is 10 years old and lives in the Puno region of Peru.

“I can tell you, she is the sweetest of them all … quite shy, but at the same time very loving once she knows people a bit. The first time she visited our office, she gave big hugs to all my colleagues, and that’s how she is remembered here, as ‘the little hugger’,” says Elsie Ralston of CARE.

Eulalia studies a bilingual curriculum with CARE’s Education Program. The school is a private project founded by a company that wants all its workers to be able to provide education for children in the area.

CARE’s Education Program in Peru promotes proper schooling for children and adolescents in vulnerable conditions, as well as the elimination of discrimination in all its forms.

“The innovative bilingual and intercultural approach allows us to empower girls in urban and rural areas. CARE seeks to address the barriers Peruvian boys, but especially girls, face, while actively advocating the investment of public resources to education,” Ralston says.

CARE has similar educational programs around the world to assist and empower girls and young women. You can help CARE continue to help girls like Eulalia in Peru.

For even more ways to make an impact on education for girls around the world, check out CNN’s Impact Your World resources or take action with 10x10.

- More about CNN Films’ “Girl Rising” project

- More from CNN’s Impact Your World