Federal judge says Arizona sheriff was racially profiling

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio stands in front of his county jail the day Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 went into effect on July 29, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona.
Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio stands in front of his county jail the day Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 went into effect on July 29, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona.

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    Judge says Sheriff Arpaio was profiling

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Judge says Sheriff Arpaio was profiling 01:32

By Ben Brumfield, CNN

(CNN) -- Arizona lawman Joe Arpaio has required prison inmates to wear pink underwear and saved taxpayers money by removing salt and pepper from prisons. He has, at times, forbidden convicted murderer Jodi Arias from speaking to the press.
The stern Maricopa County Sheriff has said the federal government will not stop him from running his office as he sees fit. But on Friday it did.
A judge ruled Friday that Arpaio's routine handling of people of Latino descent is not tough enforcement of immigration laws but instead amounts to racial and ethnic profiling.
    Some of those profiled sued Arpaio, and Judge Murray Snow found their complaints to be legitimate.
    The federal court in Phoenix ordered "America's Toughest Sheriff" -- a moniker Arpaio sports on his website -- to stop it immediately and has banned some of his operating procedures.
    The sheriff's office has a history of targeting vehicles with occupants with darker skin or Latin heritage, scrutinizing them more strictly and detaining them more often, Snow ruled.
      The sheriff's lawyers dispute the judge's conclusion.