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Harvesting the ice wine

Updated 11:23 AM ET, Mon January 7, 2013
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People empty full buckets of frozen wine grapes as temperatures show -12 degrees Celsius at Mikulov, near Brno, Czech on December 9, 2012. RADEK MICARADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images
The ice wine which is produced out of the grapes, contains over 30 percent sugar and is an exceptional and expensive specialty. RADEK MICARADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images
Ice wine made in the US, Canada and Germany (where this practice started) has to come from grapes—classically Riesling, but winemakers also use Vidal, Cabernet Franc, Seyval Blanc and others—that have frozen naturally on the vine. RADEK MICARADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images
Since the sugars do not freeze but the water in the grapes does, crushing the grapes yields tiny amounts of highly concentrated juice. RADEK MICARADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images
This accounts for the finished wine's sweet intensity, for the incredibly long time ice wine fermentation takes (months, as opposed to days); also, unfortunately, for its relatively high price. RADEK MICARADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images