Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez  has not disclosed what type of cancer he has.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez has not disclosed what type of cancer he has.

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Venezuelan Vice President Nicolas Maduro says Hugo Chavez is getting stronger

The president underwent cancer-related surgery in Cuba this month

Chavez has not disclosed what type of cancer he has

CNN —  

Hugo Chavez, who is battling cancer and recovering from a recent surgery, is getting stronger each day, the Venezuelan vice president said Saturday.

“President Chavez is resting and his recovery is progressing with each day that passes,” said Vice President Nicolas Maduro, state-run VTV reported.

Maduro said he got the update on Chavez’ health from Cilia Flores, a member of the ruling party who recently returned to Venezuela from Cuba, where Chavez underwent cancer-related surgery this month.

The president is receiving the best possible care, VTV reported the vice president said.

The Venezuelan president first announced he was battling cancer in June 2011. He has not disclosed what type of cancer he has, and the Venezuelan government has released few details about his illness.

Last week, the country’s information minster said Chavez was battling a respiratory infection. Minister Ernesto Villegas said then that the infection was controlled.

Last week, Villegas and another top government official struck a somber tone when discussing the president’s illness. Villegas has suggested Chavez might not be not be back in Venezuela in time for his inauguration scheduled for next month.

Vice President Maduro said Chavez had suffered unexpected bleeding during surgery, which he said doctors had acted quickly to control.

He said Chavez would face a “complex and difficult” recovery. Maduro’s voice cracked as he asked Venezuelans to remain united and to pray for their president.

Villegas suggested Chavez might not be not be back in Venezuela in time for his inauguration, which is scheduled for next month.

CNN’s Dana Ford and Catherine E. Shoichet contributed to this report.