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Capturing the Orionid meteor shower

Updated 10:17 AM ET, Mon October 22, 2012
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Renata Arpasova spent the early morning hours Sunday photographing the Orionid meteor shower from Wiltshire, England. Courtesy Renata Arpasova
Determined to experience his first meteor shower undisturbed by cloudy skies, Robbie López drove out to Chester, Virginia, to photograph the Orionids. Courtesy Robbie López
Kevin Lewis stayed up late and braved cold weather just so he could experience the serenity of watching the Orionids from North Wales. Courtesy Kevin Lewis
Robbie López stood out in a remote field in Chester, Virginia, to photograph the Orionid meteor shower. Courtesy Robbie López
Mike Black photographed the Orionids at 5:00 a.m. from Belmar, New Jersey. "It is worth it to see this natural phenomenon. I am always excited when I see one, it never gets old or boring or tiring," he said. Courtesy Mike Black
As a science teacher, Mike Black says he has always been a fan of meteor showers. "They remind us that we live on a small rocky world with other bits of rock flying around space," he said. Courtesy Mike Black
Using a Canon 5D Mark II camera, Mike Black photographed the Orionid meteor shower early Sunday morning. "When one of those bits of rock enters our atmosphere, it burns up and we get to enjoy a meteor shower. It's just one of nature's spectactular shows," he said. Courtesy Mike Black
Bill Vaughn says he always enjoys watching a meteor shower with his wife, especially because they never know what to expect. He photographed the Orionids from Mount Lemmon, Arizona. Courtesy Bill Vaughn
Hans-Dieter Fleger photographed the Orionid meteor shower from the foot of Mount Gaustatoppen in Stavsro, Norway, early Sunday morning. Courtesy Hans-Dieter Fleger