Living

Malnutrition in Mali

Updated 1:42 AM ET, Tue October 16, 2012
Share
1 of 7
Medical workers at the clinic in Kati, measure the upper arm of Bourama Togo. The result shows that he is suffering from acute malnutrition. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee
Water-borne diseases such as diarrhea are among the biggest killers of malnourished and vulnerable children. The IRC is repairing and rehabilitating water, sanitation, and waste management systems at six Malian health centers that serve thousands of people weekly. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee
This health center in Kati, near the Malian capital of Bamako, has treated scores of malnourished children, victims of Mali's growing hunger crisis. Although most of the children are nourished back to health, six have died at the clinic since June. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee
Only 16-months old, Jabadjie arrived at the health center in Kati weighing a little more than 9 pounds and suffering from pneumonia and anemia. Her normal weight should be twice that. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee
This boy was identified as suffering from acute severe malnutrition by IRC aid workers who visited his village. He was rushed to a health clinic for treatment and is now back home in the care of his grandmother. The IRC also provides milk and nutritional supplements to children who are at risk of falling back into malnutrition. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee
The drought has devastated the already dry Sahel region. Crops have failed, and the lean season—when food from the last harvest has run out—has arrived early. Food is available in the markets, but prices are too high for the poorest people. Here, Lamine Samaké, from the village of Diallakoroba, shows his empty grain storage hut. "This time last year it was almost full with millet," he says. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee
This young girl fled with her family to Bamako from Gao, a town in the north of Mali that is now controlled by Islamic extremists. More than 320,000 Malians have fled the north in search of food or safety, 200,000 of them seeking sanctuary in neighboring Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania. The remaining 120,000 are internally displaced. Peter Biro courtesy International Rescue Committee