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Photos: Ultra-Orthodox Jews observe Yom Kippur

Published 5:00 PM ET, Tue September 25, 2012
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Ultra-Orthodox Jews wear white holiday cloths and eat cake during noon prayers a few hours before the start of Yom Kippur, the Jewish holy day of atonement, on Tuesday, September 25, at a synagogue in the central Israeli town of Bet Shemesh. Yom Kippur, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar, starts at sundown Tuesday. AFP/Getty Images
A man prays as Ultra-Orthodox Jews perform the Tashlich ritual on Monday, September 24, in Bnei Brak, Israel. Tashlich, which means "to cast away," is the practice by which Jews go to a flowing body of water and symbolically throw away their sins during the days of repentance between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Getty Images
Ultra-Orthodox Jews pray as they perform the Tashlich ritual on Tuesday. Getty Images
Ultra-Orthodox Jews drop fish into a plastic pool as they prepare for the ritual of Tashlich. Getty Images
An Ultra-Orthodox Jew prays near a plastic pool filled with water and fish during the Tashlich ritual in the central Israeli city of Bnei Brak. AFP/Getty Images
As they perform the Tashlich ritual, Ultra-Orthodox Jews pray together. Getty Images
A youth looks on to the sea as Ultra-Orthodox Jews perform the Tashlich ritual in Tel Aviv, Israel. Getty Images
A boy looks on as Ultra-Orthodox Jews perform the Kaparot ceremony on Sunday, September 23, in Jerusalem, Israel. The Jewish ritual is supposed to transfer the sins of the past year to the chicken, and is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur. Getty Images
An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man swings a chicken over his head during the Kaparot ceremony in the Mea Shearim neighborhood of Jerusalem on Sunday. AFP/Getty Images
An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man swings a chicken over his family during the Kaparot ceremony on Thursday, September 20, in Bnei Brak, Israel. Getty Images