Living

The layers of mobile phone art

Updated 3:25 PM ET, Wed September 19, 2012
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Karen Divine set a personal challenge for herself of working exclusively on her iPhone to create her Nude series. She uses the iPhone apps Hipstamatic, Camera Plus, Image Blender, and ScratchCam, and occasionally Snapseed, PhotoCopier and Perfect Photo for smaller adjustments in her work. Courtesy of Karen Divine
Karen Divine received recognition from the international Eyephoneography photography competition and won first place in the Fine Art Nude category at the Lucie Awards for her Nude series. Courtesy of Karen Divine
"It's a Party," Karen Divine. Part of the Strange Things series published in the book and e-Book "Strange Things Are Happening in Barbara Hepworth's Bed." Courtesy of Karen Divine
"Smoking in Bed," Strange Things series, Karen Divine Courtesy of Karen Divine
"The Socerous," Karen Divine. View more of her work at iphoneart.com. Courtesy of Karen Divine
A portrait of performer Cee Lo Green by David Rams. Rams often runs photos taken on his professional camera through the apps Camera Plus and King Camera on his iPhone. Courtesy of David Rams
This portrait of model Alexa Johns was taken by David Rams and manipulated with Camera Plus Pro and King Camera. Courtesy of David Rams
"Eleven," David Rams. Part of one of his mixed media pieces, on canvas with various oil paints and glaze. He used apps Camera Plus Pro and King Camera. Courtesy of David Rams
"Grandma's Hand," David Rams. Rams took this photo of his grandmother's hand when she was on her deathbed. Courtesy of David Rams
"Malika," a portrait of David Rams' girlfriend that he took on his iPhone with Hipstamatic Follow David Rams on Instagram. Courtesy of David Rams
"Still Life #2," David Swann. The artist used his digital camera to photograph these peppers, then manipulated the image with Brushes, ToonPaint, Photo fx, Artista Oil and Pic Grunger on his iPhone. Courtesy of David Swann
"Triptych," David Swann, created by manipulating an image of dried rose pedals in Photoshop, layering them with the app Brushes on his phone, then printed on three canvases and painting over it with industrial spray paint and acrylics. Courtesy of David Swann
"Reflections," David Swann. Inkjet archival pigments and mixed media on paper. Swann used the apps Brushes and Artista Oil as well as Photoshop to create this work. Courtesy of David Swann
"Bane," Polichetti. Daria Polichetti uses the iPad apps Layers, ArtStudio and Brushes to sketch the characters for her children's book "Walby & Sticks," that she will be releasing soon. Courtesy of Daria Polichetti
"Echo," Daria Polichetti. A character in her children's book "Walby & Sticks," illustrated on the iPad Courtesy of Daria Polichetti
"Walby," Daria Polichetti. A character in her children's book "Walby & Sticks," illustrated on the iPad. Purchase prints of her work online. Courtesy of Daria Polichetti
"Inside the Lab," Daria Polichetti. One of her illustrations for her book "Walby & Sticks." She created this piece on the Wacom Cintiq monitor but illustrated the character on the iPad. See her mobile artwork on iphoneart.com Courtesy of Daria Polichetti