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Photos: Jews celebrate Rosh Hashanah

Updated 6:42 PM ET, Mon September 17, 2012
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Orthodox Jews pray as they perform Tashlich, or the casting off, at the Paris Square fountain in central Jerusalem on Monday, September 17. On the afternoon of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, it is customary to throw pieces of bread or stones into a large, natural body of flowing water to cast away the sins of the past year. EPA/Landov
Jews gather at the edge of the Mediterranean Sea in Ashdod, Israel, on Monday to recite the Tashlich prayer. EPA/Landov
Israeli Jews recite the Tashlich prayer near a water source in the Arab east Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan on Monday. AFP/Getty Images
Randy Weiner, 8, sounds the shofar during services on the first night of Rosh Hashanah at Temple Beth Shalom in Hudson, Ohio, on Sunday, September 16. The shofar, or ram's horn, is sounded at the start of the Jewish holy days and will be sounded again at the close at Yom Kippur. The Plan Dealer/Landov
Thousands of religious Jews participate in the Slichot, or forgiveness, prayer at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, in the old city of Jerusalem on Sunday, the eve of the Jewish New Year. According to the Jewish calendar, the world has existed for 5,772 years. AFP/Getty Images
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man blows a shofar, a ram's horn, as religious Jews participate in the Slichot prayer at the Western Wall on Sunday. AFP/Getty Images
Religious Jews participate in the Slichot on Sunday. AFP/Getty Images
Religious Jews prayer at the Western Wall on Sunday. AFP/Getty Images
Men wearing traditional Jewish headwear, kippahs, take part in a demonstration in Berlin on Saturday, September 15. The kippah walk, spurred from an online initiative, was aimed against anti-Semitism and took place on Rosh Hashanah. EPA/Landov
Joshua, left, and Levin wear traditional play with a stuffed animals during a demonstration called the kippah walk in Berlin on Saturday. EPA/Landov
A Jewish worshipper blows the traditional shofar, made from an antelope's horn, near the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City on Friday, September 14. Reuters/Landov
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men pray all night for forgiveness on Friday. EPA/Landov
Jewish worshippers pray at the Western Wall on Friday. Reuters/Landov
Avraham Ribak poses with a ram's skull at his shofar factory in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Friday. The shofar is used mainly on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is blown in synagogues to mark the end of the fast at Yom Kippur and at four particular occasions in the prayers on Rosh Hashanah. EPA/Landov
Avraham Ribak produces a shofar at his shofar factory in Tel Aviv on Friday. EPA/Landov
A Jewish Orthodox man blows a shofar while hundreds of Jews attend Selichot prayers, at the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City, Israel, early Wednesday, September 12. According to the local media, this specific prayer is dedicated to ask for God's protection from the possibility of Israeli attack on Iran's nuclear facilities. EPA/Landov
Workers remove notes from the cracks of the Western Wall, on Monday, September 9, to make room for more paper notes that Jews believe are notes to God. Reuters/Landov
A worker removes notes from the cracks of the Western Wall on Monday. Reuters/Landov
A girl sits on a stack of plastic chairs as her father reads from a prayer book and faces the Western Wall on the night of Saturday, September 8. Many Jews recited prayers for the beginning of a new week, which starts as Shabbat ends on sundown on Saturdays. Reuters/Landov
A young Jewish boy holds a prayer book as he follows his father to his left and others in prayer at the Western Wall. EPA/Landov