What 'X Factor' can do for Britney Spears

Britney Spears will join L.A. Reid, Demi Lovato and Simon Cowell on "The X Factor."

Story highlights

  • Spears joins the Fox singing competition still riding the success of her seventh studio album
  • Source: Being a mainstay on the show could bring a level of fame she hasn't had in years
  • Spears hasn't been accessible to her fans since she was placed in a conservatorship
Singing competition shows like "American Idol" and "The Voice" don't only make stars, they rehabilitate them.
Just ask Jennifer Lopez, whose seat at the "American Idol" judges' table paved the way for the success of her 2011 album and her recently announced summer tour. Or Maroon 5, who benefited greatly from frontman Adam Levine's spot on "The Voice." Even his fellow "Voice" judge, Christina Aguilera, cashed in on the group's best-selling single "Moves Like Jagger."
But for a megawatt star like Britney Spears, who already experienced a comeback of sorts in 2008 with the release of "Circus" not long after her fall from grace, a judging and mentoring gig on "The X Factor" isn't needed to sell albums.
Unlike her aforementioned reality show judge counterparts, Spears joins the Fox singing competition still riding the success of her seventh studio album, and her worldwide "Femme Fatale Tour." Even the star's personal life appears to be more in order these days.
But the pop princess hasn't exactly been accessible to her fans since she was placed in a conservatorship in 2008. And as stars like Lady Gaga and Beyonce have figured out, there's more to being a singing sensation in 2012 than meets the ear.
Fans want to relate to their favorite artists on a personal level, said Andy Greene, an associate editor at Rolling Stone. Becoming a mainstay on a show like "The X Factor," and showing off her personality each week, could reignite the level of fame Spears experienced in the early 2000s, Greene added.
Referencing the way Lady Gaga uses Twitter to stay connected to her fans, which she often calls her "little monsters," Greene said, "(Gaga) is part of their daily life, while B