Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid with the New York Times spent 15 years covering the Middle East. He was an intrepid and dedicated journalist reporting from the region’s hot spots.

He is described as perhaps his generation’s finest chronicler of the Middle East. He was shot in the shoulder while covering clashes in the West Bank in 2002, and kidnapped last year in Libya during the Arab Spring. He died last month of an acute asthma attack while reporting inside Syria at age 43.

His third book, “House of Stone: A memoir of home, family, and a lost Middle East” was just published in the wake of his passing.

His wife, New York Times journalist Nada Bakri, talks with Soledad exclusively this morning. She explains what conversations she had with Shadid about the dangerous of war reporting, talks about why returning to his roots was important to him, and shares with Soledad what she hopes her husband’s legacy will be.

The legacy of Anthony Shadid

02:42 - Source: CNN
The legacy of Anthony Shadid

Shadid memoir focuses on his roots

01:20 - Source: CNN
Shadid memoir focuses on his roots

Shadid widow on dangers of war reporting

03:27 - Source: CNN
Shadid widow on dangers of war reporting