Opinion: Top 5 myths about American Muslims' love lives

Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi received over 200 submissions from Muslim women who wanted to share their story.

Editor's note:  Ayesha Mattu, an international development consultant, and Nura Maznavi, an attorney, are the co-editors of "Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women."
By Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi, Special to CNN
    (CNN) -- A lot has been written about Muslim women, but very little of it has been written by Muslim women ourselves.
    The sensational stories — child brides, forced marriages, honor killings — always get the headlines, but nowhere do we see the stories of the independent, opinionated and hilarious Muslim women we know.
    We decided to change that.
    Starting five years ago, we asked fellow American Muslim women to share their stories of searching for love. We chose the topic because love is a deeply intimate yet universal emotion — and one not usually associated with Muslims.
    We received 200 submissions in response to our call for stories, which we broadcast via social media and email.
    Twenty five of the best submissions form our new book, “Love InshAllah,” which means “God willing” in Arabic and expresses the idea that it’s only through the will of God that we attain what we seek in life.
    Taken together, the stories offer a portrait of the millions of Muslims in America, which represents the most diverse Muslim community on the planet. It includes families whose roots go back to the founding of our nation and immigrants from every country imaginable.
      While compiling the book, we ran head-on into lots of myths about the love lives of American Muslim women. Here are the top 5: