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Clinton wins South Dakota as Obama clinches nomination

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  • NEW: Polling shows Clinton scored big with core constituencies
  • Clinton led among white, working-class voters, older voters and women
  • Obama led among voters who said the war in Iraq is their top concern
  • Clinton led among voters who said the economy was their main concern
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(CNN) -- Sen. Hillary Clinton will win the South Dakota primary, according to CNN projections based on exit poll results and actual voting.

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In South Dakota, polling shows Clinton ahead among white, working-class voters, older voters and women.

Despite Clinton's win in South Dakota, she falls short of the Democratic nomination for president. Her rival, Sen. Barack Obama, secured the nomination earlier in the evening.

In CNN exit polling of 763 voters in Tuesday's primary, Clinton again emerged as the clear favorite among white, working-class voters, older voters and women, the polling suggests.

Voters earning less than $50,000 a year -- almost exactly half of the poll's respondents -- said they voted for Clinton by a margin of 61 percent to 39 percent. Obama had a narrow edge among those earning more, 51 percent to 49 percent for Clinton.

Respondents 65 and older, who made up 28 percent of those polled, supported Clinton by a margin of 65-35 percent.

Eighty-four percent of South Dakota respondents said they've been affected by what pollsters called a recession. And among voters who said the economy was their main concern -- a majority at 54 percent -- Clinton led Obama 58 percent to 42 percent.

Among voters who said the war in Iraq is their top concern -- 28 percent -- Obama had a commanding 61 percent-39 percent edge. See what's next for Clinton »

Clinton's lead mirrors strong performances in other states with largely white electorates. Eighty-nine percent of those answering the poll were white, with black voters -- who have overwhelmingly supported Obama in primary after primary -- making up only 1 percent. iReport.com: See what cartoonists think of the interminable race

In what could be encouraging news for Obama, the relatively large number of Clinton supporters who said they would favor Republican John McCain over Obama in states like West Virginia didn't appear in the exit polling.

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Eighty-four percent of respondents said they would vote for Clinton, compared to 9 percent for McCain in a head-to-head contest between the two, while 77 percent said they would vote for Obama compared to 10 percent for McCain. Video Watch the latest on a possible joint ticket »

And responding to one of the hot topics of the day, more than half of all respondents -- 55 percent -- said Obama should pick Clinton as his vice presidential candidate if he is nominated. The same number said Clinton should pick Obama if she got the nod.

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