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Christina John (14 years old) stands outside her house where she lives with her husband and her mother-in-law in Rebu village in Tarime district of Mara region in Tanzania. She was married when she was little over 13 years old. She managed to finish grade 7 before she was married off.
Every year approximately 100-150 girls (ranging between 9 and 15 years) are gathered for female genital mutilation ceremony. When Christine turned 12, her mother along with other women from village took Christina and her friends to a nearby village for female genital mutilation (FGM).

â??My mother had told me what would happen and she said it is a natural thing so I was not afraid. I did not realized how painful it will be. I donâ??t think it is right to circumcise girls because it is so painful. There are women who grow their nails especially scratch you with their long nails to remove the blood clots â?? it is so painful.â?

After the procedure girls return and stay home for one month to allow their wound to heal. Once healed, they are considered ready for marriage. The community holds a â??ngomaâ?? ceremony where men come to select their wife. 

â??My father told me I had to get married because that is what women do after they have been circumcised.â?

â??John gave my father 5 cows. My father bought me a few dishes. We got married after that and left to go live at Johnâ??s house. We live here with my mother-in-law and oldest brother-in-law.â?
â??I donâ??t know how old John is. When I ask him he wonâ??t tell me, he says, why do you need to know my age. My mother says that he is 26. He works as a day labourer and load stones.â?

â??My mother-in-law wants me to have six children, but how will I educate them, how will I provide for six children? My mother-in-law also says that I will get pregnant if I take traditional medicine. But I refuse to take this medicine. I want to have three children, but I want to wait until Iâ??m about 18 or 20.â?

â??I donâ??t
Christina John (14 years old) stands outside her house where she lives with her husband and her mother-in-law in Rebu village in Tarime district of Mara region in Tanzania. She was married when she was little over 13 years old. She managed to finish grade 7 before she was married off.
Every year approximately 100-150 girls (ranging between 9 and 15 years) are gathered for female genital mutilation ceremony. When Christine turned 12, her mother along with other women from village took Christina and her friends to a nearby village for female genital mutilation (FGM).

â??My mother had told me what would happen and she said it is a natural thing so I was not afraid. I did not realized how painful it will be. I donâ??t think it is right to circumcise girls because it is so painful. There are women who grow their nails especially scratch you with their long nails to remove the blood clots â?? it is so painful.â?

After the procedure girls return and stay home for one month to allow their wound to heal. Once healed, they are considered ready for marriage. The community holds a â??ngomaâ?? ceremony where men come to select their wife. 

â??My father told me I had to get married because that is what women do after they have been circumcised.â?

â??John gave my father 5 cows. My father bought me a few dishes. We got married after that and left to go live at Johnâ??s house. We live here with my mother-in-law and oldest brother-in-law.â?
â??I donâ??t know how old John is. When I ask him he wonâ??t tell me, he says, why do you need to know my age. My mother says that he is 26. He works as a day labourer and load stones.â?

â??My mother-in-law wants me to have six children, but how will I educate them, how will I provide for six children? My mother-in-law also says that I will get pregnant if I take traditional medicine. But I refuse to take this medicine. I want to have three children, but I want to wait until Iâ??m about 18 or 20.â?

â??I donâ??t

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