Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds.

Workers from the Israeli Antiquity Authorities dig on November 3, 2015 at the excavation site near the City of David adjacent to Jerusalem's Old City walls where researchers believe to have found the remains of the stronghold the Acra, from which the Greek King Antiochus IV was able to control Jerusalem and monitor activity at the holy site known to Jews as the Temple Mount. Israel's antiquities body claimed to have solved "one of Jerusalem's greatest archeological mysteries" by unearthing from under a car park the 2,000-year-old citadel, which archaeologists have puzzled for more than a century over its location.
Workers from the Israeli Antiquity Authorities dig on November 3, 2015 at the excavation site near the City of David adjacent to Jerusalem's Old City walls where researchers believe to have found the remains of the stronghold the Acra, from which the Greek King Antiochus IV was able to control Jerusalem and monitor activity at the holy site known to Jews as the Temple Mount. Israel's antiquities body claimed to have solved "one of Jerusalem's greatest archeological mysteries" by unearthing from under a car park the 2,000-year-old citadel, which archaeologists have puzzled for more than a century over its location.

    JUST WATCHED

    Ancient Greek fort of Acra unearthed in Jerusalem

MUST WATCH

Ancient Greek fort of Acra unearthed in Jerusalem

Archaeologists believe they have found the remains of the ancient Greek fort of Acra, solving "one of Jerusalem's greatest archaeological mysteries."

Ancient Greek fort of Acra unearthed in Jerusalem

Archaeologists believe they have found the remains of the ancient Greek fort of Acra, solving "one of Jerusalem's greatest archaeological mysteries."