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A woman passes graffiti on the Falls Road referring to former Republicans who took park in the Boston college tape recordings in West Belfast, Northern Ireland on May 4, 2014. Tensions in Northern Ireland rose on May 3 after police obtained an extension to question detained republican leader Gerry Adams over a notorious IRA murder. In 2001, Boston College, a prestigious Catholic institution, researchers embarked on a project to interview participants in the Northern Ireland conflict known as the Troubles. They set about constructing an oral history of the violent period, interviewing dozens of former Irish Republican Army members and participants in voluntary paramilitary groups that supported union with Britain. Interviewees were promised absolute anonymity until after their deaths. That guarantee unraveled amid court orders, with potentially serious consequences for participants in Ireland, and fresh questions about academic freedom and the strength of researchers' confidentiality assertions in the face of a criminal investigation. "Boston College sold us out, " Belfast Project founder and journalist Ed Moloney told AFP, saying the school capitulated almost immediately when court officials demanded the recordings. . AFP PHOTO / PETER MUHLYPETER MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images
A woman passes graffiti on the Falls Road referring to former Republicans who took park in the Boston college tape recordings in West Belfast, Northern Ireland on May 4, 2014. Tensions in Northern Ireland rose on May 3 after police obtained an extension to question detained republican leader Gerry Adams over a notorious IRA murder. In 2001, Boston College, a prestigious Catholic institution, researchers embarked on a project to interview participants in the Northern Ireland conflict known as the Troubles. They set about constructing an oral history of the violent period, interviewing dozens of former Irish Republican Army members and participants in voluntary paramilitary groups that supported union with Britain. Interviewees were promised absolute anonymity until after their deaths. That guarantee unraveled amid court orders, with potentially serious consequences for participants in Ireland, and fresh questions about academic freedom and the strength of researchers' confidentiality assertions in the face of a criminal investigation. "Boston College sold us out, " Belfast Project founder and journalist Ed Moloney told AFP, saying the school capitulated almost immediately when court officials demanded the recordings. . AFP PHOTO / PETER MUHLYPETER MUHLY/AFP/Getty Images

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    Gerry Adams and the Belfast Project

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Gerry Adams and the Belfast Project

CNN's Christiane Amanpour speaks to Ed Moloney of Boston College's "Belfast Project" about Gerry Adams' history.

Gerry Adams and the Belfast Project

CNN's Christiane Amanpour speaks to Ed Moloney of Boston College's "Belfast Project" about Gerry Adams' history.