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 Members of the US salvage company Titan and Italian firm Micoperi work at the wreck of Italy's Costa Concordia cruise ship near the harbour of Giglio Porto on September 16, 2013. Salvage workers will attempt to raise the cruise ship today, in the largest and most expensive maritime salvage operation in history, so-called 'parbuckling', to rotated the ship by a series of cables and hydraulic machines. Thirty-two people died when the ship, with 4,200 passengers onboard, hit rocks and ran aground off the island of Giglio on January 2012. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLARO (Photo credit should read ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images)
 Members of the US salvage company Titan and Italian firm Micoperi work at the wreck of Italy's Costa Concordia cruise ship near the harbour of Giglio Porto on September 16, 2013. Salvage workers will attempt to raise the cruise ship today, in the largest and most expensive maritime salvage operation in history, so-called 'parbuckling', to rotated the ship by a series of cables and hydraulic machines. Thirty-two people died when the ship, with 4,200 passengers onboard, hit rocks and ran aground off the island of Giglio on January 2012. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLARO (Photo credit should read ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images)

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Concordia survivors compare experiences

Costa Concordia survivors say they were told to return to their cabins, like passengers on the sunken South Korean ferry.

Concordia survivors compare experiences

Costa Concordia survivors say they were told to return to their cabins, like passengers on the sunken South Korean ferry.