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HINCHE, HAITI - APRIL 28, 2016: Thamar Julmiste, a nurse, attends to neonates in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Hospital St. Therese in Hinche, Haiti. The neonate she is attending to was born the previous day, weighing .8 kg. He wasn't breathing when he was born (26 weeks), but they were able to recusistate him. She has worked at Hinche for three years.

5/9/16
WEB CAPTION: Nurse Thamar Julmiste (right), known for singing to her tiny patients, attends to a newborn in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at St. Thérèse Hospital in Hinche, Haiti.

5/15/16
FACEBOOK: "With more nurses knowing [how to handle these situations], we will save more children." - Nurse Thamar Julmiste
A free training program in Haiti to educate nurses in neonatal and pediatric intensive care: http://bit.ly/1Ns80pI

5/15/16
TWITTER: Neonatal and pediatric intensive care training in Haiti is helping nurses save lives: http://bit.ly/1Ns80pI

5/22/16
TWITTER: "With more nurses knowing [how to handle these situations], we will save more children." http://bit.ly/1Ns80pI

11/16/16
WEB CAPTION: Thamar Julmiste, nurse, Haiti
"I remember one nurse because she sang to the babies. She would belt out either Mariah Carey or Céline Dion."
"I was walking the hospital grounds in Hinche, a place a few hours outside of Port-au-Prince, and passed a small, narrow door. I opened it and was in this neonatal intensive care unit. It's air-conditioned, white, and pristine, and smells like a swimming pool. There were a ton of nurses in this tiny space, taking care of babies I remember one nurse because she sang to the babies. She would belt out either Mariah Carey or Céline Dion. Her name is Thamar Julmiste." - Cecille Joan Avila

1/21/16
TWITTER / FACEBOOK: [In grid w/ other photos] In clinics, on the doorsteps of homes, and at hospital bedsides, the women we've met are the backbone of health care in communities around the world. We're proud to stand beside them every step of the way. Read some o
HINCHE, HAITI - APRIL 28, 2016: Thamar Julmiste, a nurse, attends to neonates in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Hospital St. Therese in Hinche, Haiti. The neonate she is attending to was born the previous day, weighing .8 kg. He wasn't breathing when he was born (26 weeks), but they were able to recusistate him. She has worked at Hinche for three years.

5/9/16
WEB CAPTION: Nurse Thamar Julmiste (right), known for singing to her tiny patients, attends to a newborn in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at St. Thérèse Hospital in Hinche, Haiti.

5/15/16
FACEBOOK: "With more nurses knowing [how to handle these situations], we will save more children." - Nurse Thamar Julmiste
A free training program in Haiti to educate nurses in neonatal and pediatric intensive care: http://bit.ly/1Ns80pI

5/15/16
TWITTER: Neonatal and pediatric intensive care training in Haiti is helping nurses save lives: http://bit.ly/1Ns80pI

5/22/16
TWITTER: "With more nurses knowing [how to handle these situations], we will save more children." http://bit.ly/1Ns80pI

11/16/16
WEB CAPTION: Thamar Julmiste, nurse, Haiti
"I remember one nurse because she sang to the babies. She would belt out either Mariah Carey or Céline Dion."
"I was walking the hospital grounds in Hinche, a place a few hours outside of Port-au-Prince, and passed a small, narrow door. I opened it and was in this neonatal intensive care unit. It's air-conditioned, white, and pristine, and smells like a swimming pool. There were a ton of nurses in this tiny space, taking care of babies I remember one nurse because she sang to the babies. She would belt out either Mariah Carey or Céline Dion. Her name is Thamar Julmiste." - Cecille Joan Avila

1/21/16
TWITTER / FACEBOOK: [In grid w/ other photos] In clinics, on the doorsteps of homes, and at hospital bedsides, the women we've met are the backbone of health care in communities around the world. We're proud to stand beside them every step of the way. Read some o

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