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CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - JUNE 03:  In this handout provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, with the Dragon spacecraft onboard, launches from pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on June 3, 2017 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Dragon is carrying almost 6,000 pounds of science research, crew supplies and hardware to the International Space Station in support of the Expedition 52 and 53 crew members. The unpressurized trunk of the spacecraft also will transport solar panels, tools for Earth-observation and equipment to study neutron stars. This will be the 100th launch, and sixth SpaceX launch, from this pad. Previous launches include 11 Apollo flights, the launch of the unmanned Skylab in 1973, 82 shuttle flights and five SpaceX launches. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - JUNE 03:  In this handout provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, with the Dragon spacecraft onboard, launches from pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on June 3, 2017 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Dragon is carrying almost 6,000 pounds of science research, crew supplies and hardware to the International Space Station in support of the Expedition 52 and 53 crew members. The unpressurized trunk of the spacecraft also will transport solar panels, tools for Earth-observation and equipment to study neutron stars. This will be the 100th launch, and sixth SpaceX launch, from this pad. Previous launches include 11 Apollo flights, the launch of the unmanned Skylab in 1973, 82 shuttle flights and five SpaceX launches. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)

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La nueva misión de SpaceX podría solucionar este problema de la aviación

La compañía de navegación espacial de Elon Musk lanzó un grupo de satélites de la empresa Iridium Next que permitirá eliminar "zonas negras" para la detección de vuelos comerciales, por lo que tragedias como la del MH370 podrían ser cosa del pasado.

La nueva misión de SpaceX podría solucionar este problema de la aviación

La compañía de navegación espacial de Elon Musk lanzó un grupo de satélites de la empresa Iridium Next que permitirá eliminar "zonas negras" para la detección de vuelos comerciales, por lo que tragedias como la del MH370 podrían ser cosa del pasado.