Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds.

UNSPECIFIED:  In this NASA digital illustration handout released on February 22, 2017, seven TRAPPIST-1 planets are shown as they might look as viewed from Earth using a fictional, incredibly powerful telescope. The sizes and relative positions are correctly to scale: This is such a tiny planetary system that its sun, TRAPPIST-1, is not much bigger than our planet Jupiter, and all the planets are very close to the size of Earth. Their orbits all fall well within what, in our solar system, would be the orbital distance of our innermost planet, Mercury. With such small orbits, the TRAPPIST-1 planets complete a "year" in a matter of a few Earth days: 1.5 for the innermost planet, TRAPPIST-1b, and 20 for the outermost, TRAPPIST-1h. This particular arrangement of planets with a double-transit reflect an actual configuration of the system during the 21 days of observations made by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope in late 2016. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope as well as other ground-based observatories, and the ground-based TRAPPIST telescope for which it was named after.  (Photo digital Illustration by NASA/NASA via Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED:  In this NASA digital illustration handout released on February 22, 2017, seven TRAPPIST-1 planets are shown as they might look as viewed from Earth using a fictional, incredibly powerful telescope. The sizes and relative positions are correctly to scale: This is such a tiny planetary system that its sun, TRAPPIST-1, is not much bigger than our planet Jupiter, and all the planets are very close to the size of Earth. Their orbits all fall well within what, in our solar system, would be the orbital distance of our innermost planet, Mercury. With such small orbits, the TRAPPIST-1 planets complete a "year" in a matter of a few Earth days: 1.5 for the innermost planet, TRAPPIST-1b, and 20 for the outermost, TRAPPIST-1h. This particular arrangement of planets with a double-transit reflect an actual configuration of the system during the 21 days of observations made by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope in late 2016. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope as well as other ground-based observatories, and the ground-based TRAPPIST telescope for which it was named after.  (Photo digital Illustration by NASA/NASA via Getty Images)

    JUST WATCHED

    Encontramos 7 exoplanetas que podrían tener agua, ¿ahora qué?

MUST WATCH

Encontramos 7 exoplanetas que podrían tener agua, ¿ahora qué?

El astrofísico Juan Diego Soler habla de los próximos pasos para continuar la observación de los planetas que circundan a la estrella TRAPPIST-1 y averiguar la composición de sus atmósferas, si es que las tienen.

Encontramos 7 exoplanetas que podrían tener agua, ¿ahora qué?

El astrofísico Juan Diego Soler habla de los próximos pasos para continuar la observación de los planetas que circundan a la estrella TRAPPIST-1 y averiguar la composición de sus atmósferas, si es que las tienen.