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Tasnim* is a 16-year-old Syrian girl from Homs who now lives in Lebanon with her husband of two months. Her marriage was arranged by her father from Syria, with a Syrian man living in Lebanon. Her family could not leave Syria and her father was concerned that he could not protect her in Homs, where violence had escalated. Tasnim*  describes an incident where a young girl in her village was kidnapped and forced to marry her abductor. Her parents did not want the marriage to take place, but had no power to object. 

Her husband, with whom shes related, was living in Lebanon and looking for a wife when he was shown a picture of Tasnim*. Back in Syria, Tasnim* was doing her exams when she was sent a picture of her now husband. She then travelled to Lebanon with her parents to meet him at her engagement party. They were married a month later. Her parents returned to Syria after the wedding.

Tasnim*  says there are girls even younger than her getting married because their parents cannot provide for them, due to fears for their security, or because they have been orphaned.  She also says there are other girls, like her, whose parents are unable to leave Syria and feel that arranging marriages for them to men in neighbouring countries is the only way to assure their safety. 

She says getting married so young was a mistake, but she is remaining positive. She misses Syria very much. She says she would have stayed in school were it not for the war in Syria. She does not think it is right for girls to marry at a young age.

She is now attending Save the Children early marriage and positive parenting awareness-raising sessions, which provide girls who married early and those at risk with advice. Young girls and women attend the sessions to discuss the negative impact of early marriage, exchange experiences and brainstorm possible alternatives.  Married girls are also advised on best ways to raise children in healthy environment.
Tasnim* is a 16-year-old Syrian girl from Homs who now lives in Lebanon with her husband of two months. Her marriage was arranged by her father from Syria, with a Syrian man living in Lebanon. Her family could not leave Syria and her father was concerned that he could not protect her in Homs, where violence had escalated. Tasnim*  describes an incident where a young girl in her village was kidnapped and forced to marry her abductor. Her parents did not want the marriage to take place, but had no power to object. 

Her husband, with whom shes related, was living in Lebanon and looking for a wife when he was shown a picture of Tasnim*. Back in Syria, Tasnim* was doing her exams when she was sent a picture of her now husband. She then travelled to Lebanon with her parents to meet him at her engagement party. They were married a month later. Her parents returned to Syria after the wedding.

Tasnim*  says there are girls even younger than her getting married because their parents cannot provide for them, due to fears for their security, or because they have been orphaned.  She also says there are other girls, like her, whose parents are unable to leave Syria and feel that arranging marriages for them to men in neighbouring countries is the only way to assure their safety. 

She says getting married so young was a mistake, but she is remaining positive. She misses Syria very much. She says she would have stayed in school were it not for the war in Syria. She does not think it is right for girls to marry at a young age.

She is now attending Save the Children early marriage and positive parenting awareness-raising sessions, which provide girls who married early and those at risk with advice. Young girls and women attend the sessions to discuss the negative impact of early marriage, exchange experiences and brainstorm possible alternatives.  Married girls are also advised on best ways to raise children in healthy environment.

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