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INTRO DANIEL LANSBERG-RODRIGUEZ    Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez is Director for the Latin American region at Greenmantle LLC, a macroeconomic and geopolitical advising firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is a fellow at the Comparative Constitutions Project. His teaching and research focus includes political economy and constitutional and institutional development in emerging states around the world.    Daniel is a weekly political columnist for the Venezuelan newspaper El Nacional.  A regular contributor to Foreign Policy Magazine, the Financial Times, the New York Times, and The Atlantic, and his analyses have likewise appeared in Harpers, the Washington Post, the New Republic, the Economist, the Boston Review and the Los Angeles Review of Books (among others). His academic publications likewise include articles in the UCLA Law Review, the International Journal of Constitutional Law, the Indian Journal of Constitutional Law, and POLITAI.    From 2005-2007, Daniel worked at Fundación Eugenio Mendoza where he specialized in urban microfinance, and from 2009-2010 he was the division chief for entrepreneurial development at the Sucre Municipal Government in Caracas, Venezuela. Other work experience includes the private wealth management division of Goldman Sachs, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. A frequent public speaker for television and radio, he has likewise been invited to guest lecture at Harvard University, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, New York University Stern School of Business, and IESA Business School in Caracas.    Daniel holds a B.A. Cum Laude from Carleton College, a J.D. from the University of Chicago, and an M.P.P. from Harvard University with a concentration in international trade and finance.
INTRO DANIEL LANSBERG-RODRIGUEZ    Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez is Director for the Latin American region at Greenmantle LLC, a macroeconomic and geopolitical advising firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is a fellow at the Comparative Constitutions Project. His teaching and research focus includes political economy and constitutional and institutional development in emerging states around the world.    Daniel is a weekly political columnist for the Venezuelan newspaper El Nacional.  A regular contributor to Foreign Policy Magazine, the Financial Times, the New York Times, and The Atlantic, and his analyses have likewise appeared in Harpers, the Washington Post, the New Republic, the Economist, the Boston Review and the Los Angeles Review of Books (among others). His academic publications likewise include articles in the UCLA Law Review, the International Journal of Constitutional Law, the Indian Journal of Constitutional Law, and POLITAI.    From 2005-2007, Daniel worked at Fundación Eugenio Mendoza where he specialized in urban microfinance, and from 2009-2010 he was the division chief for entrepreneurial development at the Sucre Municipal Government in Caracas, Venezuela. Other work experience includes the private wealth management division of Goldman Sachs, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. A frequent public speaker for television and radio, he has likewise been invited to guest lecture at Harvard University, the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, New York University Stern School of Business, and IESA Business School in Caracas.    Daniel holds a B.A. Cum Laude from Carleton College, a J.D. from the University of Chicago, and an M.P.P. from Harvard University with a concentration in international trade and finance.

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Venezuela y los escenarios económicos después de las elecciones

Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez, director de la consultora Greenmantle LLC, dice que podría ser que el FMI volviera a ser relevante en el país.

Venezuela y los escenarios económicos después de las elecciones

Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez, director de la consultora Greenmantle LLC, dice que podría ser que el FMI volviera a ser relevante en el país.