Ben Carson

    CNN staff
    Neurosurgeon Ben Carson urged listeners, "let's not turn our backs on Israel," said Congress should offer an alternative to Obamacare before they repeal it, and defended conservatives' opposition to same-sex marriage. It was a departure from last year's speech, during which he railed with fiery rhetoric against the "P.C. police."

    Gov. Chris Christie

    CNN staff
    Gov. Chris Christie sought to defend his brash style and counter narratives that he's being outrun by Jeb Bush, saying it's too early to make sweeping predictions. The New Jersey Republican dropped a round of anti-media digs — "I'm giving up the New York Times for Lent" — to counter recent narratives about a slowed momentum.

    Carly Fiorina

    CNN staff
    Carly Fiorina, the former Hewlett-Packard executive who could be the only woman to enter the Republican race, took a series of shots at Hillary Clinton -- who she challenged to "please name an accomplishment."
    "Like Mrs. Clinton, I too have traveled the globe. Unlike Mrs. Clinton, I know that flying is an activity, not an accomplishment," she said.

    Sen. Ted Cruz

    CNN staff
    Sen. Ted Cruz is hoping his kind of conservatism could "bring back the miracle that is America." "America is in jeopardy and we are met totday in a great battlefield. The men and women who are gathered here today are gathered to fight for freedom in our country," Cruz told his CPAC audience Thursday. Cruz, who has often set himself up at odds with the Republican leadership in Congress, said voters will need to "differentiate" between true conservatives and, essentially, posers.

    Gov. Bobby Jindal

    CNN staff
    Gov. Bobby Jindal laid out his criticism of Common Core, slammed President Barack Obama on the fight against radical Islam and reemphasized the need for immigrants to assimilate in the United States. Jindal also took the opportunity to knock Obama on remarks he made earlier this month at the National Prayer Breakfast. "I'll keep my eye out for the medieval Christians," Jindal said. "Why don't you go out and win the war against radical Islam."

    Scott Walker

    CNN staff
    Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker offered a blistering critique of President Barack Obama's handling of the threat of "radical Islamic terrorism" on Thursday. "If I can take on 100,000 protesters, I can do the same across the world," he said. It was a reference to Walker's fight against labor unions in Wisconsin, where his move to strip public employees' collective bargaining rights caused months of protests, forced him to survive a recall election, and turned him into a rock star on the right.

    Sen. Marco Rubio

    CNN staff
    In a succinct address, the Florida senator said that while America's still exceptional, "you wouldn't know it by listening to the President, who's described our nation as sometimes being arrogant or dictating terms to others." "Our nation is on the decline," he added. "The good news is, we are one election away from triggering another American century." Rubio leaned heavily on his own personal story in his speech, referencing his family's immigration to America and his working-class upbringing. "America doesn't owe me anything," he said, "but I have a debt to America."

    Rick Perry

    CNN staff
    Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry slugged President Obama -- who was the sole focus of his speech and remarks in a subsequent question-and-answer session, unlike other Republicans who have hit Hillary Clinton or other party members -- for his handling of foreign threats like ISIS. He said the United States must support Israel and be sure not to "grant Iran's nuclear ambitions diplomatic cover." Perry touted tax cuts and regulatory reforms enacted in Texas as a national model, and said that there's "nothing wrong with America that cannot be fixed with new leadership."

    Sen. Rand Paul

    CNN staff
    Sen. Rand Paul, while speaking to a friendly audience, stuck largely to his stump speech but also used his background as a physician to distinguish himself from the rest of the crowded field of potential presidential candidates. "As a doctor, I will take it and make it my mission to heal the nation, reverse the course of Obamacare, and repeal every last bit of it," he said, adding that Chief Justice John Robert's decision was the "mistake of the century."

    Rick Santorum

    CNN staff
    Former Sen. Rick Santorum pitched his foreign policy experience at CPAC on Friday as he laid out the radical Islamist threat the United States faces. "Commander in chief is not an entry level position. And the oval office is no place for on the job training, not in times like this," said Santorum, who spent eight years on the Senate Armed Services Committee. Santorum had trouble building applause lines as a crowd of Sen. Rand Paul supporters filtered out of the room after Paul, a crowd favorite, left the stage. But the crowd's enthusiasm grew as Santorum shifted focus from economics and the need to "stand for the little guy" to the threat of radical Islam.

    Duck Dynasty's Phil Robertson

    CNN staff
    In between the seemingly endless parade of 2016 hopefuls -- Duck Dynasty star Phil Robertson had plenty of red meat to offer to CPAC's conservative attendees, and advice to any potential Republican Candidates. "Carry two things wherever you go in case you become president -- your bible and your woman," The former A&E reality show was not shy in asserting his own unabashedly conservative beliefs. "I am a god-loving, bible-believing, gun-toting, capitalist," Robertson declared to the crowd.

    Jeb Bush

    CNN staff
    Jeb Bush defended his positions on immigration -- and made some breaks from hard-line conservatives -- in front of a rowdy crowd Friday afternoon. The former Florida governor went all-in on his support for a giving undocumented immigrants a path to legal status, and for making in-state college tuition available for those immigrants. But he earned loud cheers from the crowd by saying he'd favor closing the U.S.-Mexico border first, before enacting any other immigration reforms, and for saying tens of thousands of Central American immigrants who arrived in Texas last summer should have been deported.