Opinion

A man walks out of the door frame of a building that collapsed after an earthquake, in the Condesa neighborhood of Mexico City on September 19.

What Mexico's earthquake means for California

By Jean-Paul Ampuero
As we wake up to footage of the devastation in Mexico in the aftermath of the second earthquake that country has suffered this month, people in California might well be wondering how well-prepared their local communities are.
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Queen of Jordan: Why global leadership on refugees matters

By Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan
This weekend, I picked up Nelson Mandela's "Long Walk to Freedom" and reread parts of this well-thumbed tome. The last time I read it, the world was a very different place; this time, I found that its themes of social inequality, injustice, resilience and courage resonated in new ways.
A man walks out of the door frame of a building that collapsed after an earthquake, in the Condesa neighborhood of Mexico City on September 19.

Seismologist: What caused Mexico's earthquake

By John Vidale
Crumpling from the downward bending of the sinking Cocos Plate deep within earth made Mexico shake, but the country's "earthquake early warning" appeared to do its job and blunt the tragedy. US could use such a system, writes John Vidale.
BERLIN - JULY 03:  Singer Elton John performs on stage during his concert in front of the Battle of Nations Monument on July 3, in Leipzig, Germany.  (Photo by Steffen Kugler/Getty Images)

'Rocket man' is awkward Dad Trump's attempt to be cool

By Michael D'Antonio
l.President Trump borrowed a song title from Elton John -- "Rocket Man" -- and started using it as a nickname for North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un even though it doesn't make any sense at all, writes Michael D'Antonio
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19:  President Donald Trump speaks to world leaders at the 72nd United Nations (UN) General Assembly at UN headquarters in New York on September 19, 2017 in New York City. This is Trump's first appearance at the General Assembly where he addressed threats from Iran and North Korea among other global concerns.

Red meat met UN blue in Trump's speech

By Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Red meat met UN blue. President Trump came to the United Nations Tuesday, his maiden voyage before the international body he has long criticized, with a reputation for plain talk and far-reaching language -- the kind of talk rarely heard in UN hallways.
Members of the 1st and 2nd Infantry Regiments of the Republican Guard (1er et 2e Regiments d'Infanterie de la Garde Repblicaine) prepare for the start of the annual Bastille Day military parade on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris on July 14, 2017.
The parade on Paris's Champs-Elysees will commemorate the centenary of the US entering WWI and will feature horses, helicopters, planes and troops. / AFP PHOTO / joel SAGET        (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

The last thing we need is a July Fourth military parade

By John Kirby, CNN National Security Analyst
We shouldn't spend our resources on a July Fourth military parade when there are important issues, like the high rate of suicide among veterans, that need to be addressed, writes John Kirby
US President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd Annual UN General Assembly in New York on September 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY        (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump's threats and themes don't add up

By Aaron David Miller and Jason Brodsky
Aaron David Miller and Jason Brodsky: President Trump's maiden speech to the UN General Assembly was a confusing hodgepodge of tropes, themes, and threats that made one unmistakable point -- there is no coherent Trump Doctrine

Santorum: Rand Paul is wrong on health care bill

By Rick Santorum
On Monday, Senator Rand Paul said the Graham-Cassidy bill will not repeal Obamacare. This is the same faulty argument I heard from a few self-proclaimed principled conservatives in 1996 when we successfully challenged President Bill Clinton to keep his promise to end welfare as we know it. They said we promised in the election to end welfare -- not, as Senator Paul now puts it, to "rearrange the furniture a bit."

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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