Opinion

This Thanksgiving, comedians should give thanks for Trump

By Dean Obeidallah
This first Thanksgiving under President Donald Trump is going to be very challenging for some. This month, Trump's approval rating hit a new low and a majority of Americans believe our nation is on the wrong track. Add to that, many of those critical of Trump are dreading the prospect of being trapped at a Thanksgiving gathering with that pro-Trump uncle who responds to every political point with, "But what about Hillary Clinton..."
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Dear Senators: Don't bankrupt our country

By Jeffrey Sachs
The US is at defining moment: the tax cuts just voted by the House could put our country into a tailspin, writes Jeffrey Sachs. In the past, the GOP could be relied upon to protect the country from short term greed; it must do so again today.
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The newspaper ad that changed everything

By Jonathan Peters
In March 1960, the New York Times published a paid ad from a group supporting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., setting off a chain of events that would change the role of the press in America and help shape our public discourse for decades, writes Jonathan Peters

Make Obamacare better with Medicare-X

By Michael Bennet and Tim Kaine
Medicare-X, a healthcare plan that would let people buy into Medicare, could reduce cost and increase options in healthcare, write Senators Michael Bennet and Tim Kaine
3 h

What you won't read in a tweet from Donald Trump

By Julian Zelizer, CNN Political Analyst
The free press is not an optional part of our democracy, it is an integral part of it, writes Julian Zelizer. Without it our political system can never be its best.

Do we love our guns more than our children?

by Tess Taylor
When I was 12, in the sixth grade in El Cerrito, California, one of my classmates brought a gun to school. She was a bright fellow student -- flamboyant, funny, sometimes moody -- occasionally in trouble, fun to play kickball with. I still remember her throaty laugh. I also remember the awful day while we stood on the play yard, as she pulled a gun out of her backpack and pointed it at a group of sixth-grade girls, threatening to shoot.
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - JUNE 30:  An American flag and Puerto Rican flag fly next to each other in Old San Juan a day after the Puerto Rican Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla gave a televised speech regarding the governments $72 billion debt on June 30, 2015 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  The Governor said in his speech that the people will have to sacrifice and share in the responsibilities for pulling the island out of debt.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Why I'm marching for Puerto Rico

By Miguel Guadalupe
Recovery efforts in Puerto Rico have been an embarrassment for the United States federal government and have left residents of the island wondering if their lives have value to this nation.
"Revenge porn" can ruin lives and cause much distress, according to Danielle Citron, who thinks it should be illegal.

The policy that the US porn industry has and Facebook needs

By Amy Adele Hasinoff
"Revenge porn" is sexual abuse in a new digital form. A recent study shows that 10% of women under 30 years old in the United States have been victimized by the misuse of their intimate images. Facebook is one of many platforms that host this kind of abuse despite its efforts to tinker with the ways users can report unauthorized content.
WASHINGTON, DC:  Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort arrives at the Prettyman Federal Courthouse for a bail hearing November 6, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The Manafort money laundering charges: What's in store?

By Stefan D. Cassella and Michael Zeldin
Paul Manafort and Richard Gates are under a multicount indictment with each facing lengthy prison terms, if convicted. Money laundering is the most serious crime charged and is premised on Manafort's and Gates' alleged failure to register with the Justice Department as foreign agents.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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