Opinion

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton waves as he takes the stage

Will Bill Clinton's best effort be enough?

By Ed Morrissey
Traditionally, the spouses of major-party nominees get a speaking slot at the national convention to humanize the candidate. Former presidents speak to remind the faithful of their history. Bill Clinton falls into both categories, but he had a far more difficult task in closing out the second night of the Democratic convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday night -- he needed to find a way to knit the party back together again.
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26:  A screen displays Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks during the evening session on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

What a moment: Clinton shatters ceiling

By Christine Quinn
Young women can now see that a woman could become president, something that will forever change how they see their places in their world, writes Christine Quinn.

When terror goes viral it's up to us to prevent chaos

By Brian McNair, The Conversation
The scent of chaos hangs heavy in the air. Donald Trump evokes it in Cleveland. Islamic State sows it in Nice, Brussels, Paris, Orlando. Britain is immersed in it after Brexit, while the EU struggles to prevent its onset amid mounting crises of migration and political legitimacy. Ukraine and Syria are being torn apart by it, and Turkey looks fragile after a failed coup.
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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop, Sunday, April 24, 2016, at the University of Bridgeport in Bridgeport, Conn.

Clinton foreign policy won't be Obama 2.0

Jonathan Cristol
The Democratic National Convention is in full swing, and anyone (like me) that thought it would be dull turned out to be in for a surprise. Bernie Sanders' supporters did not go quietly into the night. Senator Cory Booker and First Lady Michelle Obama offered rousing speeches that presented a radically different tone than what we saw at the Cleveland convention last week. And on Wednesday night, we will hear from President Barack Obama, who seems likely to place continuity under Hillary Clinton at the center of his pitch.
SOKCHO, SOUTH KOREA - JULY 15:  (SOUTH KOREA OUT) South Korean children play Pokemon Go on July 15, 2016 in Sokcho, South Korea. South Korea is not one of the initial Pokemon Go released countries, nor is the game likely to be released officially any time soon as the South Korean government does not allow Google to use its map; however, South Korean game enthusiasts are now visiting a handful of loophole areas in the north eastern side of the country near the border of North Korea to join the global frenzy of Pokemon Go.  (Photo by Jean Chung/Getty Images)

Could Pokemon Go save a city's economy?

By Danny Cevallos, CNN Legal Analyst
A South Korea town is seeing boom times due to the augmented reality game; Danny Cevallos says such games may reshape our economic landscape.
Anastasia Somoza, an international disability rights advocate, delivers remarks on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.

DNC puts disability issues front and center

By Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux
Hillary Clinton and the DNC are highlighting disability issues far more than the RNC, writes Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux. It's a victory but also a call to action.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gestures to the crowd at the start of her remarks during a primary night rally at the Duggal Greenhouse in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 7, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Clinton  has secured enough delegates and commitments from superdelegates to become the Democratic Party's presumptive presidential nominee. She will become the first woman in U.S. history to secure the presidential nomination of one of the country's two major political parties.

Who is Hillary Clinton?

An interview with Carl Bernstein
A former first lady, senator, and secretary of state, Hillary Clinton has lived in the public eye for parts of five decades, emerging now as the first woman to be the presidential nominee of a major American party. To many, though, Clinton remains an inscrutable figure -- a trailblazing feminist icon in some corners, she has long been a target of scorn and suspicion from her political opponents.
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 25:  Tape covering the mouth of a delegate from Michigan reads "Silenced By DNC" on the first day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

DNC protests: spotlight on hypocrisy

By Timothy Stanley
Tim Stanley writes that Democrats have a long belief in the power of protest and DNC protesters "deserve credit for puncturing the moral hypocrisy" of their leaders.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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