Opinion

The Cincinnati Zoo shot and killed a western lowland gorilla on Saturday after a 4-year-old boy slipped into the animal's enclosure, a zoo official said at a news conference.

After gorilla death, try empathy -- not blame

By Mel Robbins, CNN Commentator
In the aftermath of the gorilla death at the Cincinnati Zoo, Mel Robbins floats the novel idea that instead of pointing fingers, we try empathizing instead.
LYNCHBURG, VA - JANUARY 18:  Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump poses for selfies with supporters after delivering the convocation in the Vines Center on the campus of Liberty University  January 18, 2016 in Lynchburg, Virginia. A billionaire real estate mogul and reality television personality, Trump addressed students and guests at the non-profit, private Christian university that was founded in 1971 by  evangelical Southern Baptist televangelist Jerry Falwell.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Why Trump is the next Walter White

By Julian Zelizer
Americans no longer expect virtuous protagonists. For almost two decades, Americans have been tuning in to cheer on the antihero on television, on acclaimed series from "The Sopranos" to "Breaking Bad" -- and dozens more. We watch characters who do whatever is necessary to make things happen. They are not pleasant, they are unethical, they are mean and nasty, and they cheat and steal to get their way. Some even resort to torture and murder. Yet we have urged them on with our fandom and our excitement.
MIAMI GARDENS, FL - FEBRUARY 04:  Musician Prince performs during the "Pepsi Halftime Show" at Super Bowl XLI between the Indianapolis Colts and the Chicago Bears on February 4, 2007 at Dolphin Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.  (Photo by Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

Did Prince suffer from 'VIP Syndrome?'

By Robert Klitzman
While the cause of his death still unknown, reports on his medical treatment are reminiscent of a syndrome in which overawed doctors fail to provide proper care.
The 'shadow' of a victim on some steps (left) after the atomic bombing of the Japanese city of Hiroshima by the U.S., June 1946. The person had been sitting on the steps when the heat from the explosion burned the surface of the stone around the victim's body.

Where Hiroshima could happen again

By Jill Dougherty
Jill Dougherty says reading about Hiroshima as a child gave her nightmares of nuclear war with Russia and the risk of those dreams becoming a reality is rising.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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