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Inside the Middle East
February 28, 2011
Posted: 803 GMT
Masked Omani protesters jump in front of burning vehicles during a demonstration in Sohar, more than 200 kms (125 miles) northwest of Muscat. Getty Images/AFP.
Masked Omani protesters jump in front of burning vehicles during a demonstration in Sohar, more than 200 kms (125 miles) northwest of Muscat. Getty Images/AFP.

Clashes between protesters and police in the Omani industrial town of Sohar wounded about 10 people Sunday, state media reported Sunday.

At least two protesters were killed, Oman TV editor Asma Rshid told CNN.

"The police shot them because they burned shops and cars in Sohar," Rshid said. Another source said it was rubber bullets that the police fired. A number of police had also reportedly been injured, but numbers were not confirmed.

The protests started Saturday and were ongoing Sunday, said Zamzam al Rashdi, editor-in-chief of the state-run Oman News Agency.

There were about 1,000 protesters in Sohar, calling for more jobs.

The demonstration started peacefully before a couple of groups split off and started attacking a supermarket and a police station, and members from the Shura Council, al Rashdi said.

One of the targeted buildings was the Walli House, where the governor who represents the sultan in Sohar lives, a witness told CNN.

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Filed under: Oman •Protests


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henk   February 28th, 2011 8:18 am ET

All expats in Sohar being evacuated as we speak

John A   February 28th, 2011 9:57 am ET

Many say the middle east revolts were first inspired by acts of protestors in Tunisia.

Possibly now is a good time to take a little more inspiration from Tunisia?
i.e. refugees, no government or effective leadership, a sprawling angry mob with no solutions to its countries problems.

I guess the west will just have to help out with a round of crippling high interest rate bank loans. In return for this the west must benefit from cheap oil and expensive weapons sales.

Middle east evolution to democracy is great, but people should remember that divided countries are weak and easily exploited. Too much change, too quickly, will leave the middle east held hostage to western desires for another 100 years.

Daniel-2   March 1st, 2011 12:54 am ET

Hopefully,the West will lose another one of their stooges in the Middle East,this time in Oman. The fewer of them there are,the better!

John A   March 1st, 2011 11:34 am ET

Non of the middle east leaders will face a UN court, as has been suggested with Gadaffi.

A court hearing will reveal a paper trail of western arms sales and historic support for all of these leaders.

There are only two outcomes.
1) The middle east leaders will be silenced through murder
2) The leaders east leaders will be allowed exile in exchange for silence

The ones who replace them will be western puppets or demonized as enemies. If demonized, they will be attacked and replaced by western puppets.

As nothing new is really going to happen, can we move on to another topic which is less predictable?

John A   March 1st, 2011 11:35 am ET

Non of the middle east leaders will face a UN court, as has been suggested with Gadaffi.

A court hearing will reveal the paper trail of western arms sales an support for all of these leaders.

There are only two outcomes.
1) The middle east leaders will be silenced through murder
2) The middle east leaders will be allowed exile in exchange for silence

The ones to replace them will be western puppets or demonized as enemies, attacked and replaced by western puppets.

As nothing new is really going to happen, can we move on to another topic which is less predictable?

Kazmis   March 1st, 2011 5:53 pm ET

Yes, fewer old stooges but several new one from the torn down countries. Muslim state have fallen to the mouth of monsters. All young are in the impression that they can change their life in a second.

lulu   March 2nd, 2011 8:24 am ET

a responsible government source dismissed the allegations of some media means about the death of six persons in the demonstrations that took place in sohar of the Al Batinah Region.
The sourse affirmed that these news are ‘untrue’ ,lack credibility and that there was only one death case in this events

John S   March 3rd, 2011 1:51 pm ET

Reading these comments reminds me how quick people are to comment on something they know nothing about. Sultan Qaboos is not a stooge he is a man dedicated to his people, please do proper research before you start talking out of your ass. After this altercation several cabinet members were let go due to poor management, there was a blanket wage increase close to 40%, and has opened up more jobs. I dont think that constitutes a stooge!

John A   March 6th, 2011 11:47 am ET

john s,

Your blog has no real clear point. Do you want to try again?

As for stooges, the ones who have agreed to buy American treasury bills (support Americas debt) in return for western military aid a personal elevation to dictator status are stooges. Throwing some more crumbs to the people, to try and silence the mob, does not make the man a stooge or non stooge.

The people of the middle east have very legitimate grievances and reasons to protest. But the revolt we see now are western supported. The old stooges will do all they are told by the west, except send their own kingdoms into anarchy. The new stooges to be which the west have put in position (such as ElBaradei in Egypt) are there to form a supposed new democratic Arabic state that will follow instructions and attack Iran.

Mubarak didn't want this and so Mubarak is gone. Bahrain houses the 5th fleet, but forbids Bahrain as a launch pad for an attack on Iran. So Bahrain must fall to American backed rebels, unless it changes its mind.

ps the west needs to shift media attention to Saudi Arabia for the scheduled protests and revolt planned to start on the 11th March. The Saudi situation will become the front page story, so Libya needs to be finished by early to mid April.

In the next weeks we can expect our propaganda news networks to claim Gadaffi was killed by one of his own security guards. Thats a favorite western code phrase for assassinated by foreign powers. Like Mubarak we can expect Gadaffi to disappear before the western backed militia revolts can move on to the next land of conquest.

ed   March 8th, 2011 4:04 am ET

Who is the army of Kadofy,are they not the sons of the people who seak the freedom from this self profest king.The fathers and mothers,sisters and brothers must call apon the army,join us do not fight us,we are of the same flesh as you, our fight is not with you.Join us!,join us! that we my all be free.In Egipt the army did not fire apon there own flesh and blood.
The army must be perswaded to be nutral just like in Egipt.
P.S. please clean up the misspelling,I can,t spell if my life depended on it.

Robbie   March 11th, 2011 12:29 am ET

I think that these protests are getting out of hand. When people are dieing than the protests have gone too far. However the protesters should not have attacked a supermarket and police station. I don't believe it was right to kill the protesters though. The police should have used a less dangerous way of stopping the protest.

phuckislam   March 18th, 2011 12:38 am ET

Only two dead... I suppose that's a good start for mushrooms.


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