ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
   africa
   americas
   asianow
   europe
   middle east
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 NATURE
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 HEALTH
 STYLE
 IN-DEPTH

 custom news
 Headline News brief
 daily almanac
 CNN networks
 CNN programs
 on-air transcripts
 news quiz

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 TIME INC. SITES:
 MORE SERVICES:
 video on demand
 video archive
 audio on demand
 news email services
 free email accounts
 desktop headlines
 pointcast

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

 SITE GUIDES:
 help
 contents
 search

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 WEB SERVICES:

 

World - Middle East

G-8 pushes Mideast peace, as Barak moves closer to coalition

graphic

 MESSAGE BOARD:
Mideast peace
 

June 20, 1999
Web posted at: 10:26 p.m. EDT (0226 GMT)

From Jerusalem Bureau Chief Walter Rodgers

JERUSALEM (CNN) -- At their meeting this weekend in Germany, G-8 leaders asked Israel Prime Minister-elect Ehud Barak to resume early peace negotiations with Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinians.

Barak is signaling that he hopes to announce formation of a new Israeli government in the next week -- a government seen by many in Israel as likely to meet the G-8 leaders' hopes for peace.

"Barak looked around and had to define his priorities, and he's come to the conclusion the peace process is the number one priority for Israel," says Israeli political analyst Chemi Shalev. "The big difference is this government views peace as a strategic asset to Israel, contrary to the previous government, which thought it was just a danger to Israel's future."

Barak, a former army chief-of-staff, has methodically been forming a new government as if mapping out a military campaign.

His Labor Party won only 26 seats in a 120-seat parliament in the May 17 election. So he has been cobbling together a coalition government of minor parties to build a 61-seat majority.

The G-8 leaders also urged Israel to let Palestinians live as a free people -- an apparent nod toward Palestinian statehood.

But Palestinians are worried about Barak's sphinx-like nature. He has not publicly said he will implement already negotiated agreements, such as the one negotiated last fall at Wye River, Maryland.

And Barak has more than just the Palestinians wondering. He has not yet met with the U.S. ambassador to Israel, and he's given Washington no clues about where he plans to take the peace process.

Barak's silence has left everyone in the dark.



RELATED STORIES:
G-8 summit ends with promise of 'strong action' in Balkans
June 20, 1999
Syrian expert: Assad ready to offer Israel peace for land
June 16, 1999
Divided Israeli parliament seated as Barak begins coalition talks
June 7, 1999

RELATED SITES:
Israeli Government
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 LATEST HEADLINES:
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.