Skip to main content
CNN.com /TRANSCRIPTS

CNN TV
EDITIONS





CNN BREAKING NEWS

America's New War: Taliban Rejects All Pakistani Requests

Aired September 28, 2001 - 10:39   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
PAULA ZAHN, CNN ANCHOR: Let's quickly go back to John King, though, who has other breaking news from Washington. John?

JOHN KING, CNN SR. WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT: The breaking news, Paula, in Pakistan and in Afghanistan. As we've been telling you throughout the morning, a Pakistani delegation went into Afghanistan to ask the Taliban two things: One, release and turn over Osama bin Laden; two, free those western aide workers being held on charges that they were promoting Christianity, excuse me, in Afghanistan.

Christiane Amanpour standing by now for us in Islamabad with word of the outcome of that meeting.

Christiane, can you hear me?

Apparently Christiane cannot hear us. Having a technical problem there. But Taliban sources telling CNN that the answer to both demands was no, that the Taliban will not turnover Osama bin Laden, and it will not immediately release those western aide workers being held on charges that they were illegally promoting Christianity within Afghanistan.

So, a disappointing development from a diplomatic standpoint. The Pakistani delegation, this was the second one in two weeks. Once again, we are told by sources in Afghanistan that the Taliban has said no.

We want to turn now to Kelly Wallace at the White House. A very big day for the president on the diplomatic front.

Kelly, this obviously news that will be disappointing to the White House, although perhaps not unexpected.

KELLY WALLACE, CNN WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT: Absolutely, John. Disappointing, but as you're noting, not really surprising. Talked with administration officials just moments ago who said the president's demands are clear. He outlined them in his speech to Congress, the demands are turn over suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden, turn over anyone linked to the al Qaeda terrorist network, and allow the U.S. to have a access to the terrorist training camps and close them down.

I asked this official, was the administration holding out any hope that this diplomatic mission might be successful? The official saying look, it is now time for actions not words. There's no more room for negotiations. No room for talks. No room for discussions. It's time for action. So, a clear message coming from the administration.

And as you noted, a very important meeting today, John. The president sitting down with King Abdullah of Jordan. The king expected here at the White House just a few moments from now. This is a very important meeting, Jordan being the United States' closest, or one of its closest Arab allies. The president has been reaching out to moderate Arab nations to make the case that this is campaign against terrorists and those who harbor them, and not against Islam.

We're likely to see strong, strong support from Jordan in this campaign against terrorism. Although, John, it's interesting, likely to see the king also, though, making sure that there is a measured response to those September 11th attacks. The king definitely concerned to make sure that any response does not exacerbate tensions that already exist in the Middle East, and does not lead to a wider conflict on the world stage.

John?

KING: Well Kelly, you talk about a measured response. Many in the region saying the United States should go after those directly responsible for the terrorist attacks; meaning that if there's evidence that if it's Osama bin Laden and his organization, go after bin Laden. But there have been some concerns in the region that the United States is looking not only to go after bin Laden, but the changed regimes in Afghanistan by targeting the Taliban.

Certainly today's development, the Taliban once again saying no, that it will not turn over Osama bin Laden, will only intensify pressure within the administration from those who believe that should be a goal of this operation as well.

Should it not?

WALLACE: Absolutely. And as you've reported so well, too, you know that the administration clearly does not want to come forward and say that a goal is to remove the Taliban regime. But we've heard the president himself calling it an incredibly repressive regime, even encouraging the people of Afghanistan to step up and help the world community in this campaign against terrorism and those who harbor terrorists.

So clearly, the administration not wanting to come forward with that goal because of the point you raised. Concerns that that could turn away moderate Arab allies, Muslim nations concerned that this could lead to some instability in the region, instability in Afghanistan, instability in neighboring Pakistan.

So, it's a message that the administration not putting forward, but clearly the administration would not be unhappy to see that happen. And now it's sort of setting the stage for definitely some type of showdown with the Taliban. John? KING: All right. Kelly Wallace at the White House. Thank you very much.

Again, we will continue to track this breaking development in the minutes and hours ahead. The headline, a Pakistani delegation that went into Afghanistan to meet with the Taliban and ask the Taliban once again turn over Osama bin Laden, has been told no. That according to a Taliban source in Afghanistan, telling CNN the Taliban once again rejecting a request that it turn over Osama bin Laden.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com


 
 
 
 


 Search   

Back to the top