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COMPUTING

From...
PC World

Portable devices get wearable

November 19, 1999
Web posted at: 10:04 a.m. EST (1504 GMT)

by Cameron Crouch graphic

LAS VEGAS (IDG) -- Soon your wristwatch will not only tell time, but also contain your contact and schedule information.

At Comdex, Casio demonstrated PC Unite, a $99 watch that uses a wireless infrared connection to link to a Cassiopeia Windows CE device or to Microsoft Outlook on a desktop PC. The device will be available in February 2000.

Although the PC Unite is not intended as a replacement for handheld PDAs, it does let you keep basic contact management and scheduling information handy. You can send your contacts, to do list, and schedule to the watch via the IRDA port, according to Barry Raymond, director of the business solutions division at Casio.

Windows 98 in your Palm

 VIDEO
VideoCNN's Anne McDermott reports on the gee whiz items available at this year's Comdex.
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  ALSO
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• Olympus's wide-screen headset

• Comdex: Panel upbeat on imaging's future

• Sun's McNealy delivers Microsoft jokes, predicts future

• Comdex: Mobiles to do more than phone home

• Red Hat ready to increase Linux service

• Be Inc. advances Net devices strategy

• Home networking options converging


More COMDEX 1999 stories
 
  MESSAGE BOARD
Comdex
 
Casio also unveiled new models in its Cassiopeia Fiva line of handheld PCs. Fiva devices run on Windows 98, not Windows CE as do other Cassiopeia handhelds.

One new Fiva model has 64MB of memory, a 6GB hard drive, a 233-MHz processor -- and weighs less than two pounds. It will be available in the first half of 2000 and cost approximately $1799.

Casio also demonstrated a pen-based model that is due to ship next month for $2199. Also based on Windows 98, this handheld PC has a 6.7-inch touch screen and uses Smartwriter handwriting recognition software.

As with subnotebook PCs, Fiva devices do not have the battery conservation features that typical personal digital assistants would. The Fiva's battery life is only about 2 hours; an optional battery pack will give you another four to five hours, a Casio spokesperson said.



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Continuous Comdex coverage at IDG.net
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Comdex 99
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