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From...

Web users seek out news online

December 14, 1998
Web posted at: 3:00 PM EST

by Kathleen Ohlson

(IDG) -- More Web surfers are going to the Internet to read breaking news and top headlines than are getting news via radio and newspapers, according to a report by Jupiter Communications Inc.

More than 2,200 online users were questioned about their online news habits, Jupiter said in the report, which it released this week. Most users said they prefer to receive breaking news from broadcast and cable sources -- 39% and 37%, respectively -- with 12% of them hopping onto the Web for breaking news. Less popular were radio news (9%) and newspapers (2%), Jupiter said. These users are spending less than 10 minutes per online visit, so they want quick news, not deep analysis, the research firm added.

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Of those surveyed, nearly half access news through search engines or directory Web sites, and 40% read the Internet-based news via online services, Jupiter said. Consumers are also becoming familiar with online news services, such as the Associated Press, Reuters and Bloomberg, since search engines and directory sites often pull stories from those sources, the research firm added.

Sixty-one percent of online users read national and international news online, followed by business (39%), sports (34.4%), entertainment (31.3%), local news (25.9%) and technology news (20.6%), Jupiter said.

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