ad info

CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 ASIANOW
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
   computing
   personal technology
   space
 NATURE
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 HEALTH
 STYLE
 IN-DEPTH

 custom news
 Headline News brief
 daily almanac
 CNN networks
 CNN programs
 on-air transcripts
 news quiz

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 TIME INC. SITES:
 MORE SERVICES:
 video on demand
 video archive
 audio on demand
 news email services
 free email accounts
 desktop headlines
 pointcast
 pagenet

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

 SITE GUIDES:
 help
 contents
 search

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 WEB SERVICES:
Computing

From...

Are your schools wired enough?

September 30, 1998
Web posted at 3:25 PM EDT

by Industry Standard staff

MORE COMPUTING INTELLIGENCE
  IDG.net home page
  Industry Standard home page
  Industry Standard email newsletters
  Industry Standard daily Media Grok
  Industry Standard financial news
  Industry Standard e-commerce stories
  Computerworld "Emmerce"
  Fusion financial report
Free registration required to access this site
  InfoWorld Internet commerce section
 Reviews & in-depth info at IDG.net
  IDG.net's personal news page
  Questions about computers? Let IDG.net's editors help you
  Search IDG.net in 12 languages
  Subscribe to IDG.net's free daily newsletter for computer industry cognoscenti
 News Radio
  Fusion audio primers
  Computerworld Minute
     

(IDG) -- At this time next month, students and teachers in Boston will celebrate their status as the first major U.S. city to network all of its public schools. But is this enough? For most schools, "connected" means only that the library has a computer and a modem: Only one-third of connected schools have access in the classroom.

"You can count on large, rich schools being more connected than small, poor schools," says Jeanne Hayes, president of education research firm Quality Education Data.

Although tech expenditures have more than doubled since school year 1991-1992, more funding is needed to make the Internet an integral part of education at all schools. The future of the largest federal program, E-rate, is uncertain. Its $1.9 billion has not been spent and a House joint committee meeting two weeks ago debated not only the FCC's administration of the fund but also the legality of its future.

"Our priority now is to be sure this technology is being used to teach students and prepare them for the New Economy," says Bill McCarthy, press secretary for the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. "But we also don't want to see technology take away from the fundamentals of education."

PROPORTION OF U.S. PUBLIC SCHOOLS WITH INTERNET LINKS




K-12 SPENDING ON TECHNOLOGY IS UP




HANDS-ON INTERNET TIME IS INCREASING




WINTEL MACHINES WILL BE THE MAJORITY BY 2001




PARENTS MORE ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT PCs THAN THE NET




E-RATE IS LARGEST POTENTIAL SOURCE OF FEDERAL FUNDING


Related stories:
Latest Headlines

Today on CNN

Related IDG.net stories:

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window

External sites are not
endorsed by CNN Interactive.

SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

   
 

Back to the top
© 2000 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.