ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
* HEALTH
 AIDS
 Aging
 Alternative
 Cancer
 Children
 Diet & Fitness
 Men
 Women
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  health > cancer > story page AIDSAlternative MedicineCancerDiet & FitnessHeartMenSeniorsWomen

Alternative therapies gain new respect in cancer treatment

graphic
Fair, a traditional Western physician, also uses Eastern therapies for his colon cancer  

May 16, 1999
Web posted at: 8:50 p.m. EDT (0050 GMT)

From Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen

(CNN) -- Dr. Bill Fair does yoga, takes herbal supplements and meditates -- all to treat his colon cancer.

It's a sign of the times: He's a traditional Western physician, a urologist, who is using Eastern therapies.

"People are being attracted to the advantages of some of these complementary techniques and are using them more and more, and physicians are just beginning to catch up," Fair says.

Another sign of the times: Two major cancer research organizations, the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology, are for the first time holding a special meeting solely on the topics of alternative and complementary medicine.

Barrie Cassileth is in charge of what's called integrative medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. She says it's high time that establishment medicine started paying attention to other types of therapies.

She says there are reasons why doctors ignored non-Western treatments for so long.

"Most of the complementary therapies, whether they are massage therapy or St. John's wort or some other herbal remedy, are not really patentable," she says. "Therefore, no one's going to make a lot of money from them. Therefore, no one wants to put money into their investigation ... until now."

Western doctors are beginning to realize that massage and acupuncture aren't necessarily a threat to their regular practices.

Fair, for example, does both. He believes he's doing better today because of the alternative therapies plus chemotherapy and surgery.

He says it's a new way of looking at medicine, and he believes his colleagues are beginning to catch on.



RELATED STORIES:




LATEST HEALTH STORIES:
China SARS numbers pass 5,000
Report: Form of HIV in humans by 1940
Fewer infections for back-sleeping babies
Pneumonia vaccine may help heart, too
 LATEST HEADLINES:
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.