ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
* HEALTH
 AIDS
 Aging
 Alternative
 Cancer
 Children
 Diet & Fitness
 Men
 Women
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  health > story page AIDSAlternative MedicineCancerDiet & FitnessHeartMenSeniorsWomen

Cause of type-I diabetes found, researchers say

August 30, 1999
Web posted at: 5:01 p.m. EDT (2101 GMT)
DIABETES:
  • description
  • risk
  • symptoms
  • treatment
  • prevention
    Source: WebMD
  • WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- Researchers said Monday they had confirmed that type-I diabetes is triggered by the body's immune system turning on delicate cells, and they said they had found the cause.

    The findings could lead to a type of vaccine against the disease that affects more than 1 million Americans, said Susan Wong and colleagues at Yale University School of Medicine.

    Writing in the journal Nature Medicine, Wong's team said they found an antigen -- a protein that stimulates an immune response -- in mice specially bred to develop what looks like human juvenile diabetes.

    There are two types of diabetes -- type-I, also known as juvenile diabetes, and type-II, known as adult-onset diabetes. Type-II diabetes is far more common and seems to be related to diet and a lack of exercise.

    Type-I diabetes occurs when the immune system attacks the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin for the body. People with type-I diabetes do not produce enough insulin and must carefully monitor their blood sugar levels and take insulin to control them.

    There is no cure and failure to control blood sugar levels can cause blindness, limb loss and early death.

    Finding just what it is that causes the body to attack these cells could help in the development of a cure.

    They said much more work needs to be done, but it seemed that the immune system's T-cells attack an early form of insulin as it is produced by the body.

    "This is the first report to our knowledge of the identification of an antigen that can stimulate islet-reactive CD8 T-cells, and it is likely to be a naturally processed peptide of preproinsulin," they wrote.

    In a commentary, Christopher Benoist and Diane Mathis of the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Cellular Biology in Strasbourg called the findings "clear and provocative."

    Copyright 1999 Reuters. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



    RELATED STORIES:
    Could gene therapy cure diabetes?
    September 30, 1998

    RELATED SITES:
    Nature Medicine
    Yale University School of Medicine
    American Diabetes Association

    LATEST HEALTH STORIES:
    China SARS numbers pass 5,000
    Report: Form of HIV in humans by 1940
    Fewer infections for back-sleeping babies
    Pneumonia vaccine may help heart, too
     LATEST HEADLINES:
    SEARCH CNN.com
    Enter keyword(s)   go    help

    Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
    Terms under which this service is provided to you.
    Read our privacy guidelines.