ad info




Asiaweek
 home
 intelligence
 web features
 magazine archive
 technology
 newsmap
 customer service
 subscribe
 TIMEASIA.COM
 CNN.COM
  east asia
  southeast asia
  south asia
  central asia
  australasia
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 SHOWBIZ
 ASIA WEATHER
 ASIA TRAVEL


Web-only Exclusives
November 30, 2000

From Our Correspondent: Hirohito and the War
A conversation with biographer Herbert Bix

From Our Correspondent: A Rough Road Ahead
Bad news for the Philippines - and some others

From Our Correspondent: Making Enemies
Indonesia needs friends. So why is it picking fights?

Asiaweek Time Asia Now Asiaweek story

THE ASIAWEEK 1000

THE 1000 IS MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE


THIS YEAR, WE'RE ONLY providing the first 100 companies of the Asiaweek 1,000 on line. To make the file size more manageable, we've broken them into two sets:

Companies 1-50

Companies 51-100

We've supply the numbers. All you need is a calculator and a desire to find a few gems. Here's a guide to help you get the most out of the listings

1. RANK

Based on their sales in the latest fiscal year, companies are compared with each other and their own past performance

2. COMPANY

Commercial and industrial companies only are included in the 1000. Banks were ranked in the Asiaweek Financial 500 (Sept. 19 issue)

3. COUNTRY

This is where you'll find a company's operational headquarters as opposed to its legal domicile, which may be far from Asia

4. MAIN BUSINESS

Where most of a company's revenues come from

5. SALES

The most fundamental measure of a company's size. And we compare this year's numbers to last year's by percent change

6. NET PROFIT

After paying the bills and taxes, this is how much remains. Divide by SALES to figure profit margin -- how much a company clears from $1 of sales. Warning: although profit margin is meant to place all companies on the same scale, it is not very useful to compare companies from different industries or countries

7. ASSETS

The value of everything a company owns: cash, securities, land, equipment -- even intangibles like goodwill. Subtracting EQUITY from this figure gives a rough idea of long-term debt

8. EQUITY

The amount owners and investors have sunk into a company, as well as profits retained by the company rather than distributed to shareholders as dividends

9. EMPLOYEES

Obviously, some industries are more labor- intensive than others. But along with the figure for PROFIT PER EMPLOYEE, readers can use this to get an idea of how efficient a company is compared with others in the same business

10. MARKET CAPITALIZATION

A company's worth -- according to the stock market as of Nov. 5. Divide by NET PROFIT to get the price/earnings ratio. P/E is a common measure to identify cheap or expensive stocks

11. PROFIT RATIOS

Another way to compare the performance of companies. These tell how much profit a company earns from its sales, assets and capital

12. NOTES

Details about accounting periods, windfalls and unexpected losses, mergers, exchange rates and more


This edition's table of contents | Asiaweek home

AsiaNow


   LATEST HEADLINES:

WASHINGTON
U.S. secretary of state says China should be 'tolerant'

MANILA
Philippine government denies Estrada's claim to presidency

ALLAHABAD
Faith, madness, magic mix at sacred Hindu festival

COLOMBO
Land mine explosion kills 11 Sri Lankan soldiers

TOKYO
Japan claims StarLink found in U.S. corn sample

BANGKOK
Thai party announces first coalition partner



TIME:

COVER: President Joseph Estrada gives in to the chanting crowds on the streets of Manila and agrees to make room for his Vice President

THAILAND: Twin teenage warriors turn themselves in to Bangkok officials

CHINA: Despite official vilification, hip Chinese dig Lamaist culture

PHOTO ESSAY: Estrada Calls Snap Election

WEB-ONLY INTERVIEW: Jimmy Lai on feeling lucky -- and why he's committed to the island state



ASIAWEEK:

COVER: The DoCoMo generation - Japan's leading mobile phone company goes global

Bandwidth Boom: Racing to wire - how underseas cable systems may yet fall short

TAIWAN: Party intrigues add to Chen Shui-bian's woes

JAPAN: Japan's ruling party crushes a rebel at a cost

SINGAPORE: Singaporeans need to have more babies. But success breeds selfishness


Launch CNN's Desktop Ticker and get the latest news, delivered right on your desktop!

Today on CNN
 Search

Back to the top   © 2000 Asiaweek. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.