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 TIME on politics Congressional Quarterly CNN/AllPolitics CNN/AllPolitics - Storypage, with TIME and Congressional Quarterly

Poll: Equal support for Democratic , Republican candidates

Pro-impeachment hopefuls might lose some votes

By Keating Holland/CNN

WASHINGTON (October 16) -- If the election were held today, Democratic candidates for Congress would pick up as much support among likely voters as Republicans would, according to the latest CNN/TIME Poll.

While more likely voters say a candidate's stand on impeachment would not affect their vote, there are indications that a pro-impeachment stand might lose some candidates more votes than it would win them.

Also in this poll:

Thirty-two percent of likely voters say they are less likely to support a candidate who favors President Bill Clinton's impeachment, and only 17 percent of likely voters say they are more likely to vote for someone who favors impeachment.

What does the general public want to see happen? Only one in eight say they would most like to see Clinton impeached and removed from office; one in five say that they would rather see him resign, and one in four say they would prefer to see Clinton censured. One in three say they would most like to see no action taken against Clinton at all.

The number of Americans who approve of how Congress is handling its job has dropped dramatically since mid-September, and the reason may be that the public sees both parties' actions as too partisan, although the GOP comes out worse on this measure.

Clinton's job approval rating, however, remains steady, in the low 60 percent range.

The survey of 1,036 adults, including 442 likely voters, was conducted October 14-15. Most questions had a margin of sampling error of +/- 3 percentage points.

If the election for Congress were being held today, do you think you would vote for a Democratic candidate in your district or for the Republican candidate?

NowSept.
Republicans
Democrats
47%
47%
49%
45%

Asked of likely voters only
Sampling error: +/-5% pts

Now assume for a moment that Congress is faced with a decision about whether to impeach Bill Clinton. If a candidate running for Congress in your district were to support impeachment, would this make you more likely to vote for the candidate, less likely, or would it not affect your decision whether to vote for the candidate?

More likely 23%
Less likely 31%
No effect 44%

Asked of likely voters only
Sampling error: +/-5% pts

Which of the following possible outcomes of the investigation would you most like to see happen -- Clinton is impeached and removed from office? Clinton resigns from office? Clinton is censured by Congress and remains in office? Or, Clinton remains in office and Congress takes no action against him?

Censured 28%
Resign 21%
Impeached 12%
No action 34%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

Do you think the Republicans and Democrats in Congress are being too partisan in their handling of the investigation of Bill Clinton?

YesNo
Republicans
Democrats
61%
52%
31%
39%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

In general, do you approve of the job that the U.S. Congress is doing?

Now 50%
Sept. 16-17 63%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

In general, do you approve of the way President Clinton is handling his job as president?

Now 64%
Sept. 16-17 63%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

The economy

More Americans now think the U.S. economy is in good shape than felt that way last October, but the number who think things will get worse in the coming year has grown significantly in that same time, according to the survey.

Eighty-four percent now think economic conditions are good, compared to 69 percent last October. But 30 percent now say things will get worse during the next 12 months, compared to just 19 percent who expressed that opinion last fall.

Are we headed for a recession? Only a quarter predict that one will happen in the next six months, but here again economic pessimism is higher than last October.

How would you describe economic conditions in the country today -- as being good or poor?

NowLast Year
Good
Poor
84%
15%
69%
29%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

During the next twelve months, do you think the economic conditions in this country will get better, get worse or stay about the same?

NowLast Year
Better
Worse
Same
16%
30%
48%
16%
19%
62%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

Do you think it is likely or unlikely that we will have an economic recession in this country in the next six months?

NowLast Year
Likely
Unlikely
26%
65%
19%
71%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

Hillary Clinton

Most Americans respect first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, but nearly half say they do not admire her.

Nonetheless, 56 percent say they are proud to have her as first lady, slightly more than felt that way during the 1996 campaign.

Fifty-nine percent also believe she is a good role model for women, although a majority say she does not have what it takes to be president.

On another subject, which of the following apply to Hillary Rodham Clinton? 'Someone I admire' or 'someone I personally respect?'

YesNo
Respect
Admire
56%
47%
39%
49%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

Is Hillary Rodham Clinton a good role model for women?

Yes 59%
No 36%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

Are you proud to have Hillary Rodham Clinton as first lady?

Now1996
Yes
No
56%
40%
50%
45%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts

From what you know of Hillary Clinton, do you think she has what it takes to be president of the United States?

Yes 41%
No 54%

Sampling error: +/-3% pts


Investigating the President

MORE STORIES:

Friday, October 16, 1998

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