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E-mail From Washington

From: CNN
In: Washington
Posted 6-27-97

Subject: Gingrich On Taxes, Internet, Whitewater Probe

House Speaker Newt Gingrich says that although he is realistic that the president won't sign the exact budget and tax bills the House passed this week, he is confident that "the heart of the tax package that we ran in in 1994 is going to be signed into law by President Clinton."

Appearing on CNN's "Evans and Novak," Gingrich said, "I do believe he's going to sign a $500-per-child tax credit, I do believe he's going to sign educational tax breaks to help families going to vocational and technical school and college, I do believe he's going to sign a cut in the capital gains tax and I do believe he will sign a cut in the death tax which would help family, farms and small buinesses."

When asked about the items where there is a clear discrepancy between the president and Congress, Gingrich seemed to leave room for negotiation.

"I think when we sit down with the president, he's going to have some things he wants, we're going to have some things we want," the Georgia Republican said.

On indexing for capital gains, which the president last week told the Wall Street Journal he opposed, Gingrich said he refused to "draw a line in the sand and invite a veto."

Said Gingrich, "I want to get this bill signed, so for the first time in 16 years, the American people have a tax cut, but we're not going to give it up flippantly, we're going to work to keep it. I think the president has to look at what does he want. He's not going to get everything he wants; this is not a one-way street."

On the issue of Medicare, the speaker said his decision on whether or not to go along with the Senate bill, which increases the eligibility age from 65 to 67 over time and boosts premiums for more affluent seniors, will depend on the president's reaction.

"If the president is willing to sign a bill that has those reforms, which everybody agrees intellectually are needed in the long run, no one denies that we have to have some pretty basic reforms as people live longer and