WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 7:   Capitol Hill is seen through a fence as workers construct viewing stands in front of the White House for the Inaugural Parade on November 7, 2008 in Washington, DC. President-elect Barack Obama will be sworn in as the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 2009 in Washington DC.  (Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)
Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 7: Capitol Hill is seen through a fence as workers construct viewing stands in front of the White House for the Inaugural Parade on November 7, 2008 in Washington, DC. President-elect Barack Obama will be sworn in as the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 2009 in Washington DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)
Now playing
04:07
Is Senate required to wait for articles of impeachment?
Now playing
03:05
Avlon calls for training and reform in police departments
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
Governor settles with former campaign staffer who accused her of sexual mistreatment
pool/cnn
Now playing
01:56
Hear what Dr. Gupta said when Cruz went maskless before
Now playing
02:30
Biden's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan is personal for this lawmaker
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Andrew Harnik/AP
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Now playing
02:10
Why Biden made his Afghanistan announcement in this particular room
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House about the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden announced his plans to pull all remaining U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by September 11, 2021 in a final step towards ending America's longest war.
Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House about the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden announced his plans to pull all remaining U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by September 11, 2021 in a final step towards ending America's longest war.
Now playing
01:03
Biden: It's time to end the forever war
Kinzinger
CNN
Kinzinger
Now playing
05:56
What Republican lawmaker fears after US troops leave Afghanistan
CNN
Now playing
02:45
Sen. Bernie Sanders: Trump was right about this
Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., questions witnesses during a House Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP
Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., questions witnesses during a House Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Washington.
Now playing
02:59
Women detail late-night parties with Gaetz
One shot doses of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine are prepared at a clinic targeting immigrant community members on March 25, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.  The clinic, run by the St. John's Well Child and Family Center, estimates it has vaccinated more than 100,000 people in the Los Angeles area amid reports of two undocumented women who were refused coronavirus vaccinations in Orange County Rite Aid stores. Rite Aid has called the refusals mistakes in a written statement.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
One shot doses of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine are prepared at a clinic targeting immigrant community members on March 25, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. The clinic, run by the St. John's Well Child and Family Center, estimates it has vaccinated more than 100,000 people in the Los Angeles area amid reports of two undocumented women who were refused coronavirus vaccinations in Orange County Rite Aid stores. Rite Aid has called the refusals mistakes in a written statement. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:48
These unlikely events are still more likely than a blood clot after the J&J vaccine
U.S. Marines conduct an operation to clear a village of Taliban fighters in July 2009 in Mian Poshteh, Afghanistan.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
U.S. Marines conduct an operation to clear a village of Taliban fighters in July 2009 in Mian Poshteh, Afghanistan.
Now playing
03:19
Biden to announce Afghanistan withdrawal by September 11
roger wicker
CNN
roger wicker
Now playing
04:52
Sen. Wicker on Biden's infrastructure plan: Not ruling out tax hike
Representative Matt Gaetz (R-FL) arrives for a House Armed Services Subcommittee hearing with members of the Fort Hood Independent Review Committee on Capitol Hill on December 9, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Representative Matt Gaetz (R-FL) arrives for a House Armed Services Subcommittee hearing with members of the Fort Hood Independent Review Committee on Capitol Hill on December 9, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:02
Sources say Gaetz was denied meeting with Trump
CNN
Now playing
07:27
CNN anchor pushes back on Texas state lawmaker's defense of voting bill
CNN
Now playing
01:12
Tapper asks Buttigieg for infrastructure plan timeline
(CNN) —  

No final decisions have yet been made about whether close House allies of President Donald Trump’s will be a part of his defense team on the floor of the Senate during Trump’s impeachment trial, which could start as early as this week, according to an official familiar with the discussions.

Behind the scenes, many in Senate leadership have made the case that including firebrands like Republican Reps. Mark Meadows of North Carolina, Jim Jordan of Ohio or Doug Collins of Georgia might not work in the President’s favor when trying to appeal to moderate Republicans to acquit him.

“My personal recommendation would be not to include the House members. The House has its role. The Senate has its role, and I think the President will be well-represented by (White House counsel Pat) Cipollone and (Trump attorney Jay) Sekulow,” one Republican senator, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to freely discuss internal party thinking, told CNN on Monday. “The impetus for my view is we don’t want to have a continuation of the circus in the House. We would like to try and do our job with what dignity we have left.”

The decision the President’s defense team is struggling with is its audience. The argument against including the firebrand House members in the impeachment trial is that it could alienate the moderate Senate Republicans they need on their side in order to wrap the trial up quickly. But the argument for including the President’s most ardent defenders lies in what he considers the most important: vindicating him in the nation’s eyes.

Trump has pushed for his fiercest protectors to be included because he believes they will be the best at arguing against the two charges against him.

There’s little doubt that Trump will eventually be acquitted given the Republican majority in the Senate, but some GOP members in the House and Senate have made the case to the White House that giving Jordan or Meadows a prominent speaking role would be problematic for convincing Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Mitt Romney of Utah.

There’s no evidence anyone of them would vote to remove Trump at this point, but what is less clear is how they will vote when forced to vote on witnesses.

Some are arguing to the White House that it’s potentially damaging to include such polarizing figures in the President’s defense with the fear that the entire Senate trial could revolve into the partisan and circus-like atmosphere we saw in the House.

“From our standpoint, they need to keep in mind the audience is not 100 senators or even 53, it is about three, four or five,” one GOP aide said. “I am not sure bringing House members helps with the larger audience.”

CNN spoke with Meadows on Monday afternoon about if he viewed his involvement as a potential liability for winning over moderates.

“It’s not my decision to make,” Meadows said adding he did have a good relationship with many members of the Senate.

“That is a decision that is going to be made by the President and his defense team,” Meadows said. “Whether that is part of an official team or other means is really a decision for someone else to make.”

“I am going to trust (Senate Majority) Leader (Mitch) McConnell to express what would best work for my Senate colleagues and not try to second guess his decision or some of the decisions of my senate colleagues,” he added.