GOP Sen. Susan Collins: Not sure if I will support tax reform plan

Story highlights

  • "I always wait until the final version of the bill is brought before us," Collins said.
  • Collins has said she would change her decision about the bill if certain amendments are not included in the final version.

Washington (CNN)Republican Sen. Susan Collins said Sunday morning that she hasn't made a decision yet about whether or not she will vote for the the Republican tax reform plan.

During an appearance on CBS's "Face The Nation," Collins, of Maine, told host John Dickerson that she is waiting for a final version of the much-discussed bill to come out to make her decision.
"I always wait until the final version of the bill is brought before us before I make a final decision on whether or not to support it," Collins said. "There are major differences between the House and Senate bills. And I don't know where the bill is going to come out."
    Collins has said she might not support the bill if certain amendments are not included in the final version. In recent interviews, she has been clear that she wants certain provisions included in the legislation to help middle-class families.
    "I would (consider changing my vote)," she told CNN affiliate CBS WABI on Thursday. "I'm going to look at what comes out of the conference committee meeting to reconcile the differences between the Senate and House bill. So I won't make a final decision until I see what that package is."
    Collins has made similar statements since the bill passed the Senate nearly two weeks ago.
    One of the amendments she added would allow a deduction for property taxes, another would allow a provision protecting retirement benefits for employees of charities and local governments, and another would be a medical expense deduction.
    Collins, a moderate Republican, voted for the GOP's tax plan last week but helped kill the GOP's Obamacare repeal efforts earlier this year. Several aides told CNN that Collins made clear to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that she wanted to get to "yes" on the tax legislation, unlike with health care.