Sean Spicer doesn't think he ever lied while press secretary

Spicer's Emmy appearance gets mixed reviews
Spicer's Emmy appearance gets mixed reviews

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    Spicer's Emmy appearance gets mixed reviews

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Spicer's Emmy appearance gets mixed reviews 01:04

Story highlights

  • Spicer said a blanket apology is "not happening"
  • Trump thought he did a "great job" at the Emmy Awards, Spicer said

Washington (CNN)Sean Spicer doesn't believe he ever lied to the American people during his time as White House press secretary, he told ABC's "Good Morning America" Thursday.

"People have hard feelings toward you because they feel that you lied to the American people," Paula Faris said to Spicer. "Have you ever lied to the American people?"
"I don't think so," Spicer responded.
    Spicer also told Faris that a blanket apology for his misstatements as press secretary is "not happening."
    "I think that there are things that I did during my time there that I needed to go out and correct. I did that," he said. "Where there were mistakes that were made, that I got something wrong, I think I've owned that."
    Spicer, who resigned over the summer after Trump tapped Anthony Scaramucci for what became a brief stint as communications director, drew controversy on the job for his misleading statements and confrontational approach to the press corps.
    In January, Spicer told reporters that Trump's inauguration drew a larger audience than previous presidential inaugurations, despite aerial photos and Nielsen ratings indicating otherwise.
    Spicer also told the press corps that Trump had made clear his executive order on immigration in January was not a travel ban, although Trump referred to the order as a travel ban less than a week later.
    Spicer said that "of course" he regretted scolding reporters for reporting accurately on Trump's inauguration crowd, The New York Times reported Monday.
    These comments came after he played a prominent role in the Emmy Awards, taking the stage and mocking the first comments he made in the White House briefing room as the President's principal spokesman.
    Spicer told Faris that the President approved of his appearance at the awards show.
    "He was very supportive," Spicer said. "He thought I did a great job, and so it was very reassuring."