5 things for September 12: Irma's path of destruction

Every hour, Hurricane Irma got visibly worse
Every hour, Hurricane Irma got visibly worse

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    Every hour, Hurricane Irma got visibly worse

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Every hour, Hurricane Irma got visibly worse 01:17

(CNN)Hurricane Irma's victims need your help. Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and Out the Door. (You can also get "5 Things You Need to Know Today" delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)

1. The latest

Irma's a tropical depression this morning, lumbering its way through the Southeast and bringing heavy rain to Alabama and western Tennessee. Monday it brought strong winds and flooding to parts of Georgia and South Carolina. And folks are just beginning to pick up the pieces in Florida, where Irma spread its devastation across the entire state and left nearly 60% of it in the dark. As of this morning there are five storm-related deaths in the United States.
    Irma weakens to a tropical depression
    Irma weakens to a tropical depression

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      Irma weakens to a tropical depression

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    Irma weakens to a tropical depression 02:06

    2. Florida Keys

    Officials are having a hard time getting to some parts of the Keys (especially Key Largo), which seemed to bear the full brunt of Irma's wrath. Part of US 1, the highway that connects the islands with the Florida mainland, is under water. And debris in the water makes it difficult to get to the Keys by boat right now. There are reports of widespread damage and power outages, but officials just won't know how bad things are until they're able to get there. The estimated 10,000 people who rode out the storm in the Keys may need to be evacuated, according to the Defense Department, but Key West's city manager says there are no plans to do that just yet.
    Key West mayor offers reassurance to residents
    Key West mayor offers reassurance to residents

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      Key West mayor offers reassurance to residents

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    Key West mayor offers reassurance to residents 00:59

    3. Florida peninsula

    Three-fourths of Miami doesn't have power. Officials are trying to clear roads as thousands of trees are down. Marco Island, where Irma made a second landfall, is back open but doesn't have water or electricity. Jacksonville was hit with flash flooding as the St. Johns River rose to record levels. About a dozen homes in Tampa were damaged by falling trees, and flooding from rising rivers will be a problem in the coming days. Naples' mayor says his city, which mostly is without power, faces a "massive cleanup" as many trees are down and streets are flooded.
    Many airports in Florida plan to reopen today, and so do Disney World and the state's other theme parks.
    Damage assessments underway in Miami Beach
    A nearly empty street is seen as outerbands of Hurricane Irma pass through on September 9, 2017 in Miami Beach, Florida.

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      Damage assessments underway in Miami Beach

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    Damage assessments underway in Miami Beach 02:09

    4. Georgia and South Carolina

    More than 1.4 million customers lost power in Georgia, which was blasted by Irma's fierce winds and torrential downpours. Many schools in the state will be closed for a second day. So will the state government. Irma left downed trees and widespread power outages in its wake in Atlanta. More than 200,000 people in South Carolina don't have power because of the storm. There was also widespread flooding in the state's coastal areas, including Charleston.
    Millions without power after Irma
    Millions without power after Irma

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      Millions without power after Irma

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    Millions without power after Irma 02:30

    5. The Caribbean

    And don't forget about what Irma did to the Caribbean. Irma, as a Category 5 storm, left at least 36 people dead there and a trail of destruction from Barbuda to Cuba. People on St. Martin/St. Maarten, Anguilla, and the US and British Virgin Islands are in desperate need of supplies and also more security as there are reports of looting. Trees were ripped from the ground and roofs were torn from buildings in Cuba, where there was also flooding in low-lying areas.
    Hurricane Irma leaves Caribbean devastated
    hurricane irma caribbean devastated melissa bell_00014316

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      Hurricane Irma leaves Caribbean devastated

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    Hurricane Irma leaves Caribbean devastated 01:51

    IN OTHER NEWS

    Here's what's happening elsewhere.
    New sanctions on North Korea
    The UN Security Council imposed new sanctions on North Korea after its latest nuclear test. The North promised a strong response and "unbearable consequences."
    Dismal training records
    The two US Navy destroyers involved in deadly collisions in the Pacific this summer both had lengthy records of failure to fulfill key training requirements, CNN has learned.
    Brexit bill
    Brexit looks like it's still on track
    after British lawmakers passed a European Union withdrawal bill.
    UK government wins vote on EU withdrawal bill
    brexit countdown

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      UK government wins vote on EU withdrawal bill

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    UK government wins vote on EU withdrawal bill 01:37
    Time to get up
    A new study says sitting for long periods of time can kill you, even if you exercise.
    It's showtime
    Apple will unveil its latest iPhone
    -- and show off its shiny, new Silicon Valley headquarters -- later today.
    Would you pay $1,000 for the next iPhone?
    Would you pay $1,000 for the next iPhone?

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      Would you pay $1,000 for the next iPhone?

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    Would you pay $1,000 for the next iPhone? 01:35

    NUMBER OF THE DAY

    25%
    That's the percentage of any future revenue made from the "monkey selfie" that the photographer involved in a dispute with PETA will donate to animal charities.

    AND FINALLY ...

    Here's a little ray of sunshine in all the darkness that Irma has wrought. First responders in South Florida helped deliver a baby during the height of the storm.