How to make an eclipse viewer in less than 10 minutes

New York (CNN)CNN has been planning for the solar eclipse for weeks, coordinating live streams, writing tons of stories and even snagging an interview with "Total Eclipse of the Heart" singer Bonnie Tyler.

But somehow, amid all that prepping, even we forgot to snag a pair of solar eclipse glasses.
Fearing serious retina damage, we called as many stores around Manhattan as we could. But we were too late to the game: Basically everywhere is sold out.
    Thankfully, there's a DIY solution if you, like us, also waited too long to start your eclipse glasses hunt.
    You can make a pinhole projector with supplies you already have lying around at home (or in the CNN newsroom). We followed this super simple video from NASA to make ours:
    Here's what you'll need:
    • A cardboard box (cereal, cracker and small shipping boxes all work)
    • White copy paper
    • Scissors or a box cutter
    • Tape
    • Aluminum foil
    • A thumb tack, nail, needle or anything else that can punch a pinhole
    Here's how to make your very own pinhole projector:
    • Cut a strip of white paper the size of the end of your box and tape it inside.
    • Tape up the box (We used foil on the seams just to make sure absolutely no light would get in and obstruct our projection view)
    • Cut two holes on the side of the box opposite the white paper.
    • Cover one of the holes up with foil and tape it in place.
    • Punch a pinhole through the foil.
    That's it (we told you it was super simple). When the eclipse hits your neighborhood, stand with your back toward the sun and look into the open hole. The sun will come through the pinhole and project the eclipse image onto the white paper inside your viewer.