First on CNN: House Russia probe receives Flynn documents

Reports: Flynn to provide some docs to Senate
Reports: Flynn to provide some docs to Senate

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    Reports: Flynn to provide some docs to Senate

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Reports: Flynn to provide some docs to Senate 00:45

Story highlights

  • The House intelligence committee issued a pair of subpoenas to Michael Flynn last week
  • Flynn has already provided 600 pages of documents to the Senate intelligence committee

(CNN)House Russia investigators have received a batch of documents from former national security adviser Michael Flynn, the top Democrat on the committee told CNN on Thursday -- one week after issuing subpoenas to Flynn and his lobbying business.

"We're going through the documents we've received from various witnesses, including Gen. Flynn, to determine if they meet the requirements of the documents we've asked for," said Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking member on the House intelligence committee.
Asked if that meets the requirements laid out in the House subpoenas sent to Flynn, Schiff said, "I think we're still in the process of review and discussions with Mr. Flynn's counsel."
    The House intelligence committee issued a pair of subpoenas to Flynn last week, along with subpoenas to President Donald Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. Flynn, meanwhile, provided 600 pages of documents to the Senate intelligence committee in response to its own subpoenas earlier this week after his lawyers reached a document production agreement with Senate investigators.
    Schiff did not get into the details of how many documents were received from Flynn or if the House had reached a similar deal with Flynn's lawyers as the Senate.
    Congressional investigators from multiple panels have focused heavily on Flynn in their probes. The House oversight committee revealed that Flynn did not disclose payments he received from RT-TV on his 2016 security clearance application.
    Flynn initially declined to cooperate with Senate investigators, citing the Fifth Amendment as reason he should not be required to produce documents that may prove incriminating. But his lawyers later reached an agreement with Senate investigators after they pared back their request and issued additional subpoenas to his businesses.