More than 130 British imams refuse to bury London attackers

Shocking video inside Borough Market
Shocking video inside Borough Market

    JUST WATCHED

    Shocking video inside Borough Market

MUST WATCH

Shocking video inside Borough Market 00:45

Story highlights

  • "These vile murderers seek to divide our society and (instill) fear," imams say
  • Police killed three attackers after terror rampage in London

(CNN)More than 130 imams from Britain are refusing to offer Islamic burials to the three men who launched attacks Saturday night in London, killing seven and wounding dozens more.

"We will not perform the traditional Islamic funeral prayer for the perpetrators and we also urge fellow imams and religious authorities to withdraw such a privilege," the Muslim leaders said Monday in a statement posted on social media.
The imams described their actions as "unprecedented," though mosques in Manchester, England, and in the United States have refused to bury Muslims involved in terror attacks in recent years.
    Imam Abdullah Hasan of Imams Against Domestic Abuse, who posted the statement online, said the funeral rite "is normally performed for every Muslim regardless of their actions."
    Seven people died and 48 were injured when three men drove a van into pedestrians on London Bridge, then leaped out and stabbed several others in nearby bars and restaurants. Police killed the three attackers.
    British police have identified two of the three men behind Saturday night's terror attack in London as Khuram Shazad Butt and Rachid Redouane. The third attacker has been identified, police said, but his name has not been publicly released.
    The ISIS-linked Amaq News Agency claimed a "detachment of Islamic State fighters" carried out the attack but provided no evidence to back up its claim.
    British Prime Minister Theresa May said there was "too much tolerance" of Islamist extremism in the United Kingdom as she vowed a clampdown in the wake of the third terror attack to hit her country in as many months.
    In their statement, the imams said the terrorists do not represent Islam.
    "We are deeply hurt that a spate of terror attacks have been committed in our country once more by murderers who seek to gain religious legitimacy for their actions. We seek to clarify that their reprehensible actions have neither legitimacy nor our sympathy," the Muslim leaders said.
    "These vile murderers seek to divide our society and (instill) fear; we will ensure they fail. We implore everyone to unite: we are one community. In the face of such dastardly cowardice, unlike the terrorists, we must uphold love and compassion."
    Thousands of Muslims worldwide have likewise condemned terrorism in recent years, as noted in a 712-page Google document maintained by an American Muslim student.