Jared Kushner, seen but not heard

Story highlights

  • Despite the first son-in-law's White House role, he keeps a low public profile
  • Kusher has a verified Twitter account with no tweets
  • The FBI is looking into his contact with Russian officials, although there are currently no allegations of wrongdoing

Washington (CNN)Behind the scenes, President Trump's 36-year-old son-in-law Jared Kushner plays a powerful role in the White House.

His official title is senior adviser to the President and his West Wing office is the same one once occupied by President Barack Obama's strategists David Plouffe and David Axelrod. He is one of two people in the administration who have the dual job of family and administration member, the other being his wife Ivanka Trump.
But publicly, Kushner is seen but not heard.
    Trump campaigned as unapologetically "politically correct," refusing to back down from statements seen as offensive or inflammatory. And his administration is one often marked by its pop-culture-dominating soundbites and tweets, from Kellyanne Conway's "alternative facts" to Trump's "covfefe." It makes Kushner's silence all the more unusual.
    He has a verified Twitter account with no tweets. He declined to comment for recent stories about him, including a Time magazine cover story and a Washington Post investigation into how he and his company used loans meant for poor areas to build a luxury residential skyscraper.
    And to most Americans, the very sound of his voice is a mystery.
    But you can hear it in a few videos on YouTube. There's one of him speaking to a group about Brooklyn real estate, to a Jehovah's Witness program about buying one of their buildings, and to SundanceTV about buying the New York Observer. His voice sounds young, and he sometimes stretches out the sound of his vowels.
    Both he and Ivanka are keeping a low profile after it was reported the FBI is looking into his role in the Trump campaign and transition, his contact with Russian officials and his relationship with former national security adviser Michael Flynn. There are no allegations of wrongdoing, and there is no indication Kushner is a current target of the FBI's investigation.
    But even without the cloud of scandal, perhaps Kushner's silence is best. A Wednesday Monmouth poll found Americans think Sean Spicer, Kellyanne Conway and Trump himself do more harm than good when they speak on the administration's behalf. If you don't say anything, you don't have any gaffes.
    Kushner did make a rare cameo last month during a CBS interview with his wife, spotted peeking in. Despite the hosts attempts to get him to join the the interview, he declined, nervously laughing, at one point blowing a kiss, and answering just one question about how their walk on the Mall was.
    "It was beautiful," he said. "Great company. And beautiful scenery."