Presidential impeachment 101: What to know
Presidential impeachment 101: What to know

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Presidential impeachment 101: What to know 01:32

What would impeachment look like?

Updated 10:17 AM ET, Thu May 18, 2017

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(CNN)We are a long, long way from any sort of serious impeachment effort against President Donald Trump, but more and more Democrats are using the word.

Check back when Democratic leaders like House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer join them. And take note of the fact that a large number of Republicans would have to break ranks and support the effort in order for it to succeed
Until then, below is a simple guide to the complicated steps for impeachment. Click here for a more in-depth explanation.

First, the allegation of impeachable offenses, including "high crimes and misdemeanors" must be made. A special counsel like former FBI Director Robert Mueller or a number of other organizations or individuals can start the process.

Second, the House of Representatives must investigate the investigation, usually through its judiciary committee.

Third, the full House must vote on articles of impeachment and the Senate then holds a public trial on the Senate floor with the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presiding.

The Clinton impeachment trial on the Senate floor in Washington D.C. on February 12, 1999.

Is this possible? Republicans currently control both chambers of Congress, so they'd have to break with a president from their own party in a very big way.