Disabled voter confronts UK Prime Minister Theresa May about benefit cuts

theresa may confronted disability benefits bts_00000000
theresa may confronted disability benefits bts_00000000

    JUST WATCHED

    British PM confronted at outdoor market

MUST WATCH

British PM confronted at outdoor market 01:31

Story highlights

  • May was confronted while talking to constituents at a local market in Abingdon-On-Thames, England
  • "I can't live on 100 pounds a month," disabled woman said

(CNN)An angry voter scolded British Prime Minister Theresa May on Monday over cuts to disability benefits.

"Theresa, are you going to help people with learning disabilities and mental health?" demanded a woman, who identified herself as Cathy. May was confronted while talking to constituents at a local market in Abingdon-On-Thames, England.
May had recently refused to rule out further cuts to disability benefits, but defended her government's support for the mentally disabled.
    "I've got mild learning disabilities and I haven't got a carer at the moment. I'm talking about everybody, not just me," Cathy told May. "I'm talking about for everybody that's got mental health and anybody who's got learning disabilities."
    May responded by saying the government has plans for people with mental health issues.
    "That's what we want to ensure when we look at the help that we're giving to people with any disability is that particularly we focus on those who are most in need, so that we're helping those who are most in need," May said.
    Yet her reassurance did not appease the woman in the video, who called on May to do more for those with learning and mental disabilities.
    "The fat cats keep the money and us lot get nothing," Cathy said. "I can't live on 100 pounds a month. They took it all away from me."
    The encounter comes just weeks before the UK's snap election on June 8. May made the unexpected call for elections in April less than halfway through her government's 5-year term. The Prime Minister's Conservative Party, which commands only a slim majority in Parliament's lower House of Commons, hopes to strengthen its mandate in the government and in the Brexit negations.
    May hopes to capitalize on the low approval ratings of the opposition Labour Party and convince voters that the Tories are best suited to lead the UK in this historic transition.