MLB gathering information on team fan behavior policies

Baseball is grappling with two recent incidents involving racist behavior by fans at Fenway Park.

Story highlights

  • MLB is gathering information from all of its teams regarding their policies regarding fan behavior
  • This comes after two incidents involving racist behavior at Fenway Park in Boston

(CNN)Major League Baseball currently is collecting information to review policies regarding fan behavior at MLB ballparks.

Chief Communications Officer Patrick Courtney told CNN the league is gathering the information on fan-behavior practices by its 30 teams "as a first step."
This comes after the Boston Red Sox addressed two separate incidents at Fenway Park this week.
On Tuesday, the Red Sox issued an apology for racist behavior exhibited Monday night toward Baltimore Orioles outfielder Adam Jones, who said a fan threw a bag of peanuts at him and that he was called the N-word.
MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred also responded with a strongly worded statement.
"The racist words and actions directed at Adam Jones at Fenway Park last night are completely unacceptable and will not be tolerated at any of our ballparks," Manfred said Tuesday. "My office has been in contact with the Red Sox, and the club has made it clear that they will not tolerate this inexcusable behavior. Our 30 Clubs will continue to work with fans and security to provide a family-friendly environment. Any individual who behaves in such offensive fashion will be immediately removed from the ballpark and subject to further action."
In a second incident Tuesday, a fan was ejected and banned from Fenway Park for life after reportedly directing a racial slur at another fan. Again, the Red Sox responded swiftly.
"During Tuesday night's Red Sox-Orioles game, it was reported to Red Sox security that a racial slur was used in a comment from one fan to another fan," the Red Sox said in a statement released Wednesday. "The offending individual was promptly ejected from the ballpark, and has since been notified they are no longer welcome at Fenway Park.
"The Red Sox organization will not tolerate the use of racial slurs at Fenway Park, and we have apologized to those affected. There is no place for racial epithets at Fenway Park, in baseball, or in our society. The Red Sox have turned the matter over to the Boston Police Department, who will further investigate with their civil rights unit and determine whether it merits further action."
According to WEEI, Red Sox president Sam Kennedy said Wednesday he believed this was the first time a fan had been banned from Fenway for life.