Judge orders release of White House fence jumper, GPS monitoring

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Story highlights

  • Tran breached the White House perimeter Friday night
  • He was ordered to comply with a mental health evaluation

(CNN)A federal district court judge in Washington on Monday released Jonathan Tran, the accused White House fence jumper, on his own recognizance under certain conditions.

They include being fitted with a GPS tracking device, remaining within 100 miles of his home in the San Jose, California-area, staying away from the White House, remaining in the country and traveling to Washington only for court appearances and attorney meetings.
Tran, who breached the White House perimeter Friday night, was further ordered to comply with a mental health evaluation and told he cannot have guns or any other weapons. He will be under the supervision of pre-trial services in San Jose where he must report at 10 a.m. PT on March 16 and be fitted with the GPS tracking device.
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Tran, 26, appeared in an orange jumpsuit, was charged with entering restricted grounds while carrying a dangerous weapon. He did not enter a plea in Monday's court session.
Both the government and defense attorneys agreed to the terms of Tran's release and GPS tracking.
When the judge asked questions about the GPS monitoring, counsel approached the bench and the judge turned on white noise to ensure no one could hear the discussion.
During the session Monday, Tran answered questions from the judge about his mental and financial state.
Asked by the judge if he had "any health conditions that would make it difficult for you to understand what is happening in court today?" Tran replied: "I don't believe so."
The judge asked if he had taken any medication in the last 24 hours and Tran said he had not.
When asked if he has a job Tran replied: "Not at the moment."
He requested and received court approval to have a public defender.
In response to other questions Tran told the judge he has no children, does not own a home or a car and is a US citizen.
Tran was very quiet, keeping his head down the entire time and only looking up when asked a direct question by the judge.
He will next appear in court for a preliminary hearing in Washington on April 13 at 1:30 p.m. ET.