Franklin Graham, Paula White among faith leaders participating in Trump inauguration

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Story highlights

  • Trump's team said, "A diverse set of faith leaders will offer readings and prayers at the swearing-in"
  • Rev. Franklin Graham, president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, is on the list

(CNN)Donald Trump's inaugural committee announced Wednesday six faith leaders who will participate in the swearing-in ceremony of the President-elect.

Archbishop of New York Cardinal Timothy Michael Dolan; Reverend Dr. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference; and Paula White, pastor of New Destiny Christian Center will offer readings and give the invocation.
Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center; Rev. Franklin Graham, president of Samaritan's Purse and president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association; and Bishop Wayne T. Jackson, senior pastor of Great Faith Ministries International will also offer readings and give the benediction.
"Since the first inaugural ceremony, our leaders have paid tribute to the blessings of liberty that have been bestowed upon our country and its people," Committee Chairman Tom Barrack said in a Trump transition statement. "I am pleased to announce that a diverse set of faith leaders will offer readings and prayers at the swearing-in of President-elect Trump and honor the vital role religious faith plays in our multicultural, vibrant nation."
Dolan sat between Trump and his Democratic challenger, Hillary Clinton, in October at the Al Smith dinner in New York. Both candidates traded biting insults with each other, with Trump saying Clinton "hates Catholics." Dolan later said that Clinton and Trump prayed together before the dinner.
Exit polls show that more than 80% of white evangelicals backed Trump in the 2016 election and more than half of Catholics voted for the Presbyterian Protestant.
But less than a quarter of Jewish voters backed Trump. And only 26% of voters marking "none" as their religion backed the President-elect.