Poll: Trump, Clinton neck and neck in Georgia

CNN polls: Clinton, Trump fight for battleground states
CNN polls: Clinton, Trump fight for battleground states

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    CNN polls: Clinton, Trump fight for battleground states

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CNN polls: Clinton, Trump fight for battleground states 08:10

Story highlights

  • Most surveys have not shown Georgia to be as close a race as Arizona
  • Clinton has not campaigned extensively or spent much money in the Peach State

Washington (CNN)A new poll's findings raise the question if Hillary Clinton may have chosen the wrong state to try and flip.

The Democratic nominee sits just 1 point behind Donald Trump in Georgia but 5 points behind Trump in Arizona, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey.
    Trump's edge in the Peach State is well within the poll's margin of error.
    Most surveys have not shown Georgia to be as close a race as is Arizona, where Clinton campaigned Wednesday. Trump leads in Georgia 45% to 44%, and in Arizona 45% to 40%.
    Clinton has not campaigned extensively or spent much money in the Peach State. She has run millions of dollars of ads in Arizona, and her campaign has also sent Michelle Obama and Bernie Sanders to the state in recent weeks.
    In Texas, a vote-rich state where Trump has been underperforming previous top-of-the-ticket Republicans, Trump leads solidly -- 49% to 40%, the survey shows.
    Green Party candidate Jill Stein does not earn more than 3% in any state, and Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson, a former New Mexico governor, takes in 9% in neighboring Arizona, 6% in neighboring Texas and 8% in the state of Georgia.
    In down-ballot contests, Georgia GOP incumbent Johnny Isakson only earned 48% support, raising the prospect that he could fall short of the 50% threshold and that a January runoff could be required.
    The polls, fielded from October 30 to November 1, surveyed 948 registered voters in Arizona for a margin of error of 3.2 points and 719 likely voters for 3.7 percentage points; 937 registered voters in Georgia for a margin of error of 3.2 points and 707 likely voters for 3.7 points; and 943 registered voters in Texas for a margin of error of 3.2 points and 679 likely voters for 3.8 points.